Archive Page 2

07
Jan
12

2012 World Junior Championship

Host Cities: Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
December 26, 2011 – January 5, 2012
RESULT: SILVER MEDAL

One year after winning the gold medal in an exhilarating comeback against Canada, Russia came to these world juniors with almost an entirely new roster, with team captain Evgeni Kuznetsov being the only returning player. Coach Valeri Bragin included a record six players from the Canadian junior leagues on the team, including the potential no. 1 NHL draft pick Nail Yakupov. Russia began the tournament on a confident note, giving up only one goal in its first three games and destroying Latvia 14-0. In this game, Kuznetsov came one point short of tying Peter Forsberg’s record for the most points (ten) in a single world junior championship game. Leading Sweden 3-0 in its following game, Russia collapsed in the third period and lost 4-3 in overtime, forcing the team to play a quarterfinal match against the Czechs. The quarterfinal featured the best goaltending battle of the tournament with 17-year old Andrei Vasilevski and Czech goalie Petr Mrazek both putting on world-class performances. After eliminating the Czechs in a tight victory, Russia had to face a relaxed Canada in the semifinal the next day. Russia’s fatigue didn’t factor until the third period, as the team took a commanding 6-1 lead with only 12 minutes left to play and garbage being thrown on the ice by the disappointed Canadian fans. That was when Canada launched one of the most amazing comeback attempts in the history of Russia-Canada confrontations. The team in red scored four goals in the span of five minutes, forcing the excellent Vasilevski to be replaced in net by Andrei Makarov. Canada worked until the final second to try tie the game, but Russia held on to win 6-5. Given that Russia was outshot by more than a 2-1 margin, it is fair to say that goaltending once again saved the team. Facing Sweden for the gold medal, Russia clearly had not physically or mentally recovered from the semifinal. It took the Russian offense 13 minutes to register a single shot on goal. Sweden had nearly total puck control and fired a whopping 58 shots on Makarov, but the scoreless game did not truly open up until the final ten minutes, when both teams launched one dangerous attack after another. Sweden dominated the overtime period and deservedly won the game after a Russian turnover enabled Mika Zibanejad to face Makarov one-on-one and score the game’s only goal. Sweden’s win was its first world junior gold medal in 31 years. It was unfortunate that Russia did not find its usual up-tempo game, but given that most of its players were just 17 and 18 years old, they will have another chance to fight for gold next year on home ice. After the game, Kuznetsov was named the tournament MVP, best forward, and member of the media all-star team.

Game 1: Russia 3 – Switzerland 0
Goals: Khokhlachev, Gusev (Kosov, Grigorenko), Grigorenko (Kucherov, Gusev)
Shots: Russia 30 – Switzerland 40
Saves: Vasilevski 40 – Wof 27
PIM: Russia 8 – Switzerland 6

Game 2: Russia 3 – Slovakia 1
Goals: Ozhiganov (Yakupov, Kosov), Naumenkov (Zemchenko), Kucherov (Grigorenko, Nesterov) – Bubela
Shots: Russia 40 – Slovakia 32
Saves: Makarov 31 – Simboch 37
PIM: Russia 20 – Slovakia 2

Game 3: Russia 14 – Latvia 0
Goals: Grigorenko (Kucherov, Gusev), Sergeyev (Yakupov, Arzamastsev), Kuznetsov (Yakupov, Antipin), Kuznetsov (Gusev, Nesterov), Zheldakov (Kuznetsov, Gusev), Gusev (Kuznetsov, Nesterov), Gusev (Kucherov, Kuznetsov), Kulikov (Kuznetsov, Zemchenko), Khokhlachev (Yakupov, Naumenkov), Kuznetsov (Gusev, Kucherov), Zemchenko (Kulikov, Kuznetsov), Kosov (Apalkov, Barbashev), Khokhlachev (Telegin, Antipin), Nesterov (Gusev, Kuznetsov)
Shots: Russia 50 – Latvia 30
Saves: Vasilevski 30 – Merzlikins 36
PIM: Russia 10 – Latvia 10

Game 4: Russia 3 – Sweden 4 (OT)
Goals: Zemchenko (Yakupov), Kosov (Barbashev, Apalkov), Telegin – Klefbom (Larsson), Rakell (Nemeth, Larsson), Friberg (Brodin, Nordstrom), Nordstrom (Nemeth, Friberg)
Shots: Russia 26 – Sweden 55
Saves: Vasilevski 51 – Gustafsson 23
PIM: Russia 16 – Sweden 4

Quarterfinal: Russia 2 – Czech Republic 1
Goals: Apalkov (Barbashev, Arzamastsev), Zheldakov (Kucherov) – Culek (Hertl, Jaskin)
Shots: Russia 45 – Czech Republic 39
Saves: Vasilevski 38 – Mrazek 43
PIM: Russia 4 – Czech Republic 2

Semifinal: Russia 6 – Canada 5
Goals: Kuznetsov (Yakupov), Nesterov (Zheldakov), Kuznetsov (Khokhlachev, Yakupov), Kuznetsov (Yakupov, Sergeyev), Khokhlachev (Kuznetsov, Yakupov), Kucherov (Grigorenko, Zemchenko) – Connolly (Hamilton, Huberdeau), Hamilton (Sheifele, Strome), Schwartz (Gallagher), Gallagher (Hamilton), Gormley (Gallagher)
Shots: Russia 24 – Canada 56
Saves: Vasilevski 44/49, Makarov 7/7 – Wedgewood 9/13, Visentin 9/11
PIM: Russia 16 – Canada 54

Final: Sweden 1 (OT) – Russia 0
Goals: Zibanejad (Nemeth)
Shots: Sweden 58 – Russia 17
Saves: Gustafsson 17 – Makarov 57
PIM: Sweden 4 – Russia 8

Team Stats:

Player GP G A PTS +/- PIM
D #3   Artyom Sergeyev 7 1 1 2 +1 12
D #4   Viktor Antipin 7 0 2 2 +5 2
D #6   Mikhail Naumenkov 7 1 1 2 +2 8
D #7   Igor Ozhiganov 7 1 0 1 +3 4
D #12 Grigori Zheldakov 7 2 1 3 +6 4
D #24 Zakhar Arzamastsev 7 0 2 2 +2 2
D #26 Ildar   Isangulov 6 0 0 0 +2 6
D #29   Nikita Nesterov 7 2 3 5 +7 6
F #8   Nikita Gusev 7 3 6 9 +5 0
F #9   Nikita Kucherov 7 2 5 7 +4 2
F #10   Nail Yakupov 7 0 9 9 +4 6
F #14   Daniil Apalkov 7 1 2 3 +2 0
F #15   Pavel Kulikov 7 1 1 2 +3 2
F #16   Ignat Zemchenko 7 2 3 5 +4 2
F #17   Mikhail Grigorenko 6 2 3 5 +2 0
F #18   Yaroslav Kosov 7 2 2 4 +5 0
F #19   Alexander Khokhlachev 7 4 1 5 +5 6
F #22   Sergei Barbashev 7 0 3 3 +2 0
F #23   Ivan Telegin 6 1 1 2 0 12
F #25   Evgeni Kuznetsov (C) 7 6 7 13 +6 4
Goaltender GP W L GAA Save % SO
G #1   Sergei Kostenko 0 0 0 0 0 0
G #20   Andrei Makarov 3 1 1 0.88 97.9 0
G #30   Andrei Vasilevski 5 4 1 2.01 95.3 2

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11
Dec
11

Semyon Varlamov

Full name: Semyon Aleksandrovich Varlamov
Team: Colorado Avalanche
Number: 1
Position: Goaltender
Height: 6’2”/189 cm
Weight: 209 lbs/95 kg
Catches: Left
Born: April 27, 1988 in Samara, RUS
Drafted: Selected by the Washington Capitals in the 1st round (23rd overall) of the 2006 Entry Draft

Strengths: Varlamov is a prototypical butterfly-style goaltender with excellent reflexes, flexibility, and size. Varlamov has a very good save percentage early into his NHL career and is developing into a long-term no. 1 goaltender.

Weaknesses: Injuries and inconsistency had prevented Varlamov from playing a full NHL season until his fourth season. Varlamov’s puckhandling skills are his main weakness.

Biography:  Semyon Varlamov was born in Samara (then still known as Kuybyshev) – an industrial city on the Volga. After moving to Yaroslavl, a city further up the Volga, Varlamov developed into the best goalie prospect in his age group with the Lokomotiv hockey organization. Playing his way through the farm league, Varlamov debuted in the Superleague at the age of 18 and quickly became Lokomotiv’s number one goaltender. In 2007, Varlamov was Russia’s goaltender at the World Junior Championship and helped the team to a silver medal finish. Even before then, he was already drafted by the Washington Capitals and had good NHL potential. After two successful seasons in the Superleague, Semyon came to North America to play for Washington’s farm club. Throughout the regular season of 2008-09, he was called up to the big club a few times and proved to be effective, winning 4 of 6 games. The average play of Capitals starting goalie Jose Theodore prompted the club to entrust Varlamov with the goaltending duties for the playoffs. Varlamov was excellent, registering two shutouts in the first round against the Rangers. The Capitals were ultimately eliminated by the Penguins in game 7 of the second round, but Varlamov had left his mark as the team’s prospective no. 1 starter. Semyon continued collecting victories in the next season, but an injury two months in forced him to undergo a conditioning stint with the farm club. Varlamov regained his position towards the end of the season, but the Capitals only lasted one playoff round. In 2010, Varlamov was named to Russia’s Olympic team, but did not see any ice time. Semyon’s chance to shine for the national team came at the 2010 World Championship, where he went undefeated until Russia’s tight loss to the Czechs in the final. Semyon spent his third NHL season mostly as the backup to fellow young goalie Michal Neuvirth. However, Varlamov was selected to start in the 2011 Winter Classic outdoor game against the Penguins. In Washington, Varlamov was one of three Russians, along with Alexander Ovechkin and Alexander Semin, to have a strong fan following. He even starred in a humorous ad with Ovechkin. In the 2011 off-season, the Capitals decided to go in a different direction with their goaltending and traded Varlamov to the Colorado Avalanche. In Colorado, Varlamov is starting in a lot more games than he did in Washington, but also has a more fragile and younger team in front of him. In 2012, Varlamov once again was the main goaltender for Russia at the World Championship. This time, Varlamov won all 8 games that he started, including the gold-medal final. For the duration of the 2012-13 NHL lockout, Varlamov returned to play for the club that developed him, Lokomotiv, and put up outstanding numbers.

Club Stats:

Season Team

GP

W

L

T

OL

GAA

Save %

SO

2004-05 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

8

2.43

1

2005-06 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

33

2.02

8

2006-07 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

2

1.50

0

2006-07 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

33

2.17

3

2007-08 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

44

2.45

3

2008-09 Hershey (AHL)

27

19

7

1

2.40

92.0

2

2008-09 Washington

6

4

0

1

2.37

91.8

0

2009-10 Hershey (AHL)

3

3

0

0

1.95

93.3

0

2009-10 Washington

26

15

4

6

2.55

90.9

2

2010-11 Hershey (AHL)

3

2

1

0

3.36

85.5

0

2010-11 Washington

27

11

9

5

2.23

92.4

2

2011-12 Colorado

53

26

24

3

2.59

91.3

4

2012-13 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

16

8

4

3

1.74

94.6

3

2012-13 Colorado

35

11

21

3

3.02

90.3

3

Totals RHL/KHL Reg. Season

77

2.23

6

Totals RHL Playoffs

22

2.00

5

Totals NHL Reg. Season

147

67

58

18

2.61

91.2

11

Totals NHL Playoffs

19

10

9

2.49

91.5

2

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament

GP

W

L

T

GAA

SO

2005 World U18

2

2

0

0

3.52

0

2005 World U18

2

2

0

0

2.50

0

2006 World U20

1

1

0

0

1.00

0

2007 World U20

6

5

1

0

1.51

2

2010 Olympic Games

0

0

0

0

0

0

2010 World Championship

5

4

1

0

1.41

1

2012 World Championship

8

8

0

0

1.77

1

2013 World Championship

4

2

1

0

3.59

0

Totals U18 Level

4

4

0

0

3.01

0

Totals U20 Level

7

6

1

0

1.44

2

Totals Senior Level

17

14

2

0

2.09

2

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13
Nov
11

Nikolai Kulemin

Full name: Nikolai Vladimirovich Kulemin
Team: Toronto Maple Leafs

Number: 41
Position: Left Wing
Height: 6’1”/186 cm
Weight: 220 lbs/100 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: July 14, 1986 in Magnitogorsk, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Toronto Maple Leafs in 2nd round (44th overall) of the 2006 Entry Draft

Strengths: Kulemin is an effective defensively-responsible forward with plenty of speed, grit, and a heavy shot. He rarely gives up fighting for the puck, fits in well on any line he is assigned to, and is reliable in any situation in the game.

Weaknesses: While Kulemin has proved that he is a 30-goal scorer, he sometimes falls into long dry spells throughout the season. He doesn’t seem to take as many shots on net as he is capable of.

Biography: Like his friend and fellow NHL star Evgeni Malkin, Nikolai Kulemin was born and raised in the steelmaking city of Magnitogorsk in the southern Ural Mountains. As a teenager, Kulemin developed with the local Metallurg hockey school and made it to the professional league at the age of 17. In 2004, Kulemin was a member of Russia’s team that won gold at the under-18 championship. In his third professional season, Kulemin was transferred to Magnitogorsk’s main club, which played in the Russian Superleague. The 2006-07 season was a breakthrough year for Nikolai. Not only did his Metallurg win the Superleague championship, but he was also named the league MVP after tallying 27 goals in 54 games. After one more productive season in Russia, Kulemin moved on to play in the NHL for the Toronto Maple Leafs, the team that had drafted him in 2006. Nikolai became one of the few players in Leafs history to score in his first NHL game – it was the gamewinning goal against the Detroit Red Wings. Nikolai’s adjustment to North American hockey and life was eased by the presence of three other Russian speakers on the Maple Leafs – Nikolai Antropov, Alexei Ponikarovsky, and Mikhail Grabovski. Towards the end of the 2009-10 season, Kulemin was promoted to his team’s first line with sniper Phil Kessel and centre Tyler Bozak. In 2010-11, Kulemin emerged as the Leafs’ hardest working player and one of the league’s best two-way forwards. His line with Grabovski and Clarke MacArthur was the team’s most consistent and also arguably the NHL’s most productive second line. Nikolai also broke the 30-goal mark for the first time in his career. In just his fourth NHL season, Nikolai is already the longest-tenured player in Toronto. Kulemin has also played for Russia in five world championship tournaments and has won silver and bronze medals, as well as the gold medal in 2012. During the 2012-13 NHL lockout, Nikolai returned to his hometown to play for Metallurg. Playing on a line with Evgeni Malkin and Sergei Mozyakin, Kulemin scored at more than a point-per-game rate. He returned rejuvenated to Toronto and helped the Leafs make the playoffs for the first time in eight seasons.

Club Stats:

Season Team

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

2003-04 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

43

8

18

26

91

2004-05 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

43

9

13

22

44

2005-06 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

4

3

1

3

6

2005-06 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

31

5

7

12

8

2006-07 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

54

27

12

39

42

2007-08 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

57

21

12

33

63

2008-09 Toronto (AHL)

5

0

0

0

0

2008-09 Toronto

73

15

16

31

-8

18

2009-10 Toronto

78

16

20

36

0

16

2010-11 Toronto

82

30

27

57

+7

26

2011-12 Toronto

70

7

21

28

+2

6

2012-13 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

36

14

24

38

+25

26

2012-13 Toronto

48

7

16

23

-5

22

Totals RHL/KHL Reg. Season

178

67

55

122

139

Totals RHL Playoffs

37

14

7

21

45

Totals NHL Reg. Season

351

75

100

175

-4

88

Totals NHL Playoffs

7

0

1

1

-9

0

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

2004 World U18

6

0

2

2

2

2006 World U20

4

4

2

6

25

2006 World Championship

7

1

3

4

2

2007 World Championship

9

2

1

3

0

2010 World Championship

9

3

2

5

25

2011 World Championship

9

1

0

1

2

2012 World Championship 10 1 3 4 0
Totals U18 Level

6

0

2

2

2

Totals U20 Level

4

4

2

6

25

Totals Senior Level

44

8

9

17

29

Photo Gallery:

16
Oct
11

Remembering Lokomotiv

In memory of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl hockey team that perished in the air crash of September 7, 2011.

Roster:

Number Player Position Date of Birth Place of Birth
1 Stefan Liv G 12/21/1980 Gdynia, POL
3 Pavel Trakhanov D 03/21/1978 Moscow, RUS
4 Karel Rachunek D 08/27/1979 Zlin, CZE
11 Alexander Galimov F 05/02/1985 Yaroslavl, RUS
13 Daniil Sobchenko F 04/13/1991 Kiev, UKR
15 Jan Marek F 12/31/1979 Jindrichuv-Hradec, CZE
17 Ivan Tkachenko F 11/09/1979 Yaroslavl, RUS
18 Alexander Vasyunov F 04/22/1988 Yaroslavl, RUS
20 Robert Dietrich D 07/25/1986 Ordzhonikidze, KAZ
21 Gennady Churilov F 05/05/1987 Magnitogorsk, RUS
23 Nikita Klyukin F 11/10/1989 Rybinsk, RUS
24 Ruslan Salei D 11/02/1974 Minsk, BLR
28 Alexander Kalyanin F 09/24/1987 Chelyabinsk, RUS
32 Sergei Ostapchuk F 03/19/1990 Novopolotsk, BLR
35 Alexander Vyukhin G 01/09/1973 Ekaterinburg, RUS
37 Karlis Skrastins D 07/09/1974 Riga, LAT
38 Pavol Demitra F 11/29/1974 Dubnica, CZE
39 Mikhail Balandin D 07/27/1980 Lipetsk, RUS
52 Maxim Shuvalov D 04/23/1993 Rybinsk, RUS
57 Vitali Anikeenko D 01/02/1987 Kiev, UKR
63 Josef Vasicek F 09/12/1980 Havlickuv Brod, CZE
72 Artem Yarchuk F 05/03/1990 Yaroslavl, RUS
74 Marat Kalimulin D 08/12/1988 Togliatti, RUS
81 Yuri Urychev D 04/03/1991 Yaroslavl, RUS
83 Andrei Kiryukhin F 08/04/1987 Yaroslavl, RUS
Brad McCrimmon Coach 03/29/1959 Dodsland, CAN
Alexander Karpovtsev Coach 04/07/1970 Moscow, RUS
Igor Korolev Coach 09/06/1970 Moscow, RUS
Nikita Krivonosov Trainer 07/07/1980 Minsk, BLR
15
May
11

2011 World Championship

Host Cities: Bratislava and Kosice, Slovakia
April 29 – May 15, 2011
RESULT: 4th PLACE

This tournament brought Russia’s four-year medal streak at the World Hockey Championships to an end. Russia entered the tournament with a weaker group of players than in 2010, but still brought plenty of familiar faces, with only two players (Vladimir Tarasenko and Nikolai Belov) making their WC debut. Plenty of weaknesses became apparent as Russia struggled right from the opening game, getting shut-out by Germany, and in subsequent tight victories against lesser hockey powers like Slovenia and Denmark. The coaching staff entrusted Evgeni Nabokov to be the starting goaltender. Having sat out most of the season, Nabokov was not in ideal shape and suffered a leg injury in the fourth game, forcing Konstantin Barulin of KHL’s Atlant to handle the remaining games. Russia was also set back by an underwhelming group of centres, a struggling powerplay, undisciplined play from Alexei Emelin and Evgeni Artyukhin, and a faulty defense. Alexander Ovechkin was parachuted in to boost the offense, but he did not register a single point. After losing its remaining round-robin games to the Czech Republic and Finland, Russia faced off against the young and talented Canadian team in the quarterfinals. As usual, this matchup provided for the most entertaining hockey of the tournament, with Canada leading 1-0 midway through the third period. Alexei Kaigorodov then deked through the Canadian defence and scored a beautiful shorthanded goal to tie the game. A few minutes later, Ilya Kovalchuk sniped in the game-winner from Alexander Radulov’s pass. This tandem was Russia’s main highlight in the tournament. By defeating Canada in the quarters for the second straight year, Russia did not have enough energy and willpower to maintain such tempo for the rest of the tournament and went on to lose in the semifinal to Finland and in the bronze-medal game to the Czechs (this turn of events resembled the 2006 Olympics for Russia). What is especially concerning is that Russia lost five games out of nine. While Vyacheslav Bykov’s record as Russia’s coach is still an impressive 40 wins to 9 losses, a fourth place finish is clearly a disappointment.

Game 1: Germany 2 – Russia 0
Goals: Greilinger (Braun), Reimer
Shots: Germany 27 – Russia 31
Saves: Endras 31 – Nabokov 25
PIM: Germany 6 – Russia 4

Game 2: Russia 6 – Slovenia 4
Goals: Atyushov (Kovalchuk, Radulov), Afinogenov (Korneev), Kulikov (Kaigorodov), Artyukhin (Afinogenov, Kaigorodov), Radulov (Kovalchuk, Gorovikov), Zinoviev (Zaripov) – Hebar (Gregorc), Golicic (Sivic, M. Hocevar), Golicic (M. Hocevar), Pajic (Tavzelj)
Shots: Russia 25 – Slovenia 35
Saves: Nabokov 31 – A. Hocevar 19
PIM: Russia 33 – Slovenia 6

Game 3: Russia 4 – Slovakia 3
Goals: Radulov (Kovalchuk, Tyutin), Nikulin (Kovalchuk, Tyutin), Nikulin (Kovalchuk), Morozov (Atyushov, Kaigorodov) – Satan (Nagy, Jurcina), Gaborik (Demitra), Nagy (Majesky, Visnovsky)
Shots: Russia 31 – Slovakia 32
Saves: Nabokov 17/20, Barulin 12/12 – Halak 27
PIM: Russia 8 – Slovakia 14

Game 4: Russia 4 – Denmark 3
Goals: Zinoviev (Nikulin, Zaripov), Zinoviev (Morozov, Zaripov), Zinoviev (Zaripov, Morozov), Artyukhin (Korneev, Kalinin) – Hardt (Starkov), Boedker (Hersby), Hardt (Starkov)
Shots: Russia 40 – Denmark 22
Saves: Nabokov 15/18, Barulin 4/4 – Andersen 36
PIM: Russia 14 – Denmark 6

Game 5: Czech Republic 3 – Russia 2
Goals: Voracek (Rolinek, Skoula), Jagr (Plekanec), Plekanec – Tereshchenko (Atyushov, Radulov), Zaripov (Kalinin, Zinoviev)
Shots: Czech Republic 33 – Russia 26
Saves: Pavelec 24 – Barulin 30
PIM: Czech Republic 8 – Russia 16

Game 6: Finland 3 (SO) – Russia 2
Goals: Koivu (Puistola), Niskala (Immonen) – Kulemin (Kulikov, Artyukhin), Nikulin (Zaripov, Morozov)
Shots: Finland 32 – Russia 35
Saves: Vehanen 3/5, Lassila 30/30 – Barulin 29
PIM: Finland 12 – Russia 12

Quarterfinal: Russia 2 – Canada 1
Goals: Kaigorodov, Kovalchuk (Radulov, Kalinin) – Spezza (Pietrangelo)
Shots: Russia 20 – Canada 37
Saves: Barulin 36 – Bernier 18
PIM: Russia 10 – Canada 12

Semifinal: Finland 3 – Russia 0
Goals: Granlund (Immonen), Lajunen, Immonen (Granlund)
Shots: Finland 29 – Russia 30
Saves: Vehanen 30 – Barulin 26
PIM: Finland 12 – Russia 10

Bronze medal game: Czech Republic 7 – Russia 4
Goals: Cervenka, Prucha (Rolinek, Marek), Prucha, Cervenka (Prucha), Plekanec (Cervenka), Marek, Plekanec (Jagr, Cervenka) – Kovalchuk (Radulov, Tyutin), Kulikov (Afinogenov, Gorovikov), Kovalchuk (Radulov, Zinoviev), Tarasenko (Zinoviev, Korneev)
Shots: Czech Republic 28 – Russia 43
Saves: Pavelec 39 – Barulin 21
PIM: Czech Republic 4 – Russia 6

Team Stats:

Player GP G A PTS +/- PIM
D #5 Ilya Nikulin 9 3 1 4 0 2
D #7 Dmitry Kalinin 9 0 3 3 +4 4
D #22 Konstantin Korneev 9 0 3 3 +3 0
D #37 Denis Grebeshkov 2 0 0 0 +1 0
D #43 Dmitry Kulikov 9 2 1 3 -3 4
D #44 Nikolai Belov 6 0 0 0 +1 4
D #51 Fedor Tyutin 9 0 3 3 -3 0
D #74 Alexei Emelin 9 0 0 0 -5 29
F #8 Alexander Ovechkin 5 0 0 0 -3 4
F #21 Konstantin Gorovikov 9 0 2 2 -1 2
F #23 Alexei Tereshchenko 8 1 0 1 -5 2
F #25 Danis Zaripov 9 1 5 6 0 0
F #41 Nikolai Kulemin 9 1 0 1 -4 2
F #42 Sergei Zinoviev 9 4 3 7 +2 4
F #47 Alexander Radulov (A) 9 2 5 7 -1 6
F #49 Evgeni Artyukhin 9 2 1 3 0 24
F #55 Alexei Kaigorodov 8 1 3 4 0 2
F #61 Maxim Afinogenov 9 1 2 3 +2 6
F #71 Ilya Kovalchuk (A) 9 3 5 8 -1 6
F #91 Vladimir Tarasenko 6 1 0 1 -3 0
F #95 Alexei Morozov (C) 9 1 3 4 -1 8
Goaltender GP W L GAA Save % SO
G #20 Evgeni Nabokov 4 2 1 3.60 88.0 0
G #83 Vasili Koshechkin 0 0 0 0 0 0
G #84 Konstantin Barulin 7 2 4 2.80 90.8 0

Photo Gallery:

10
May
11

Alexander Radulov

Full name: Alexander Valerievich Radulov
Team: CSKA Moscow (KHL)
Number: 47
Position: Right Wing
Height: 6’1”/186 cm
Weight: 200 lbs/ 91 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: July 5, 1986 in Nizhniy Tagil, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Nashville Predators in 1st round (15th overall) of the 2004 Entry Draft

Strengths: “Radu” is a high-octane, game-breaking forward who excels at creating scoring chances not just for himself, but for his linemates as well. He is a feisty player and is hard to contain for the opposing defensemen.

Weaknesses: The consequence of being such an explosive player is that Radulov is prone to overplaying the puck, leading to turnovers. His spirited style at times leads to undisciplined plays and costly penalties.

Biography: Alexander was born and raised in the northern Urals city of Nizhniy Tagil, in the Sverdlovsk region. When he was still a child, he moved with his brother Igor (also a future NHL player) to Yaroslavl to study at a sports school. Radulov began his professional hockey career at the age of seventeen with THK Tver in the Russian Hockey League’s second tier (the Major League) and was one of the leading scorers at the Under-18 World Championships, where Russia won gold. By the end of his first season, Radulov got to play in one game for Dynamo Moscow in the Superleague. In 2004, Radulov was drafted by both the NHL (the Nashville Predators) and by Canada’s Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (the Quebec Remparts). In his two years with the Remparts, Alexander made a strong impression. Following his first year in North America, he was selected to the QMJHL’s All-Rookie Team. In 2006, Radulov was a First-Team All-Star, the MVP, and the leading scorer among all Canadian major junior leagues. He broke various club records, including most goals in a game twice (seven) and established a 50-game point streak that was second only to Mario Lemieux’s in the league’s history! Radulov’s experience in Quebec was capped off with his team becoming the Canadian Hockey League champions (and Radulov being awarded the Stafford Smythe Memorial Trophy as the MVP of the Memorial Cup playoffs). Alexander began the next season with the Milwaukee Admirals of the American Hockey League, but less than two months later gained a permanent roster spot with the Nashville Predators. Radulov brought over his flair and eccentric goal celebrations over to the NHL, where he became the most popular player in Nashville. He played in the NHL YoungStars Game in 2007 and finished his rookie season with an impressive plus-minus rating. After his breakthrough second year, in which he scored 26 goals, Radulov signed a three-year contract with Salavat Yulaev Ufa in Russia’s KHL. This was seen as a breach of his NHL contract that had one remaining year, and Alexander was suspended by the Predators for the entire 2008-09 season once he played a game for Ufa. On Salavat Yulaev, Alexander quickly found chemistry with almost any players assigned to his line, including Sergei Zinoviev, Igor Grigorenko, and Patrick Thoresen. In each subsequent season in the KHL, Radulov increased his production. In 2010, he managed to score the quickest goal in Russian hockey history – just seven seconds into a game. At the end of the 2009-10 season, Radulov was awarded the “Golden Stick” award as the KHL’s most valuable player. After two years of playoff disappointment, Radulov’s team made it to the KHL playoff final and won the Gagarin Cup in 2011. Alexander was one of coach Vyacheslav Bykov’s most trusted players, as they’ve won together not just the Gagarin Cup, but also one bronze and two gold medals with the national team at the World Championships. Radulov scored the game-winning goal of the 2009 World Championship gold medal final. After Salavat Yulaev was eliminated in the first round of the 2012 KHL playoffs, Radulov went back to the Predators to fulfill the remainder of this NHL contract. Afterwards, Radulov signed a four-year contract with CSKA Moscow.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
2003-04 THK Tver (RHL-2) 42 15 16 31 102
2003-04 Dynamo Moscow 1 0 0 0 2
2004-05 Quebec (QMJHL) 65 32 43 75 +30 64
2005-06 Quebec (QMJHL) 62 61 91 152 +53 101
2006-07 Milwaukee (AHL) 11 6 12 18 +3 26
2006-07 Nashville 64 18 19 37 +19 26
2007-08 Nashville 81 26 32 58 +7 44
2008-09 Salavat Yulaev Ufa 52 22 26 48 +26 92
2009-10 Salavat Yulaev Ufa 54 24 39 63 +44 62
2010-11 Salavat Yulaev Ufa 54 20 60 80 +27 83
2011-12 Salavat Yulaev Ufa 50 25 38 63 +1 64
2011-12 Nashville 9 3 4 7 +3 4
2012-13 CSKA Moscow 48 22 46 68 +12 86
Totals RSL/KHL Reg. Season 259 113 209 322 +110 389
Totals KHL Playoffs 56 12 40 52 +14 58
Totals NHL Reg. Season 154 47 55 102 +29 74
Totals NHL Playoffs 18 6 8 14 +3 29

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
2004 World U18 6 2 5 7 2
2005 World U20 6 2 1 3 4
2006 World U20 6 1 3 4 4
2007 World Championship 9 2 0 2 6
2008 World Championship 6 0 3 3 2
2009 World Championship 9 4 6 10 10
2010 Olympic Games 4 1 1 2 4
2011 World Championship 9 2 5 7 6
2013 World Championship 8 5 5 10 4
Totals U18 Level 6 2 5 7 2
Totals U20 Level 12 3 4 7 8
Totals Senior Level 45 14 20 34 32

Photo Gallery:

05
Apr
11

Alexei Zhitnik

Full name: Alexei Nikolaevich Zhitnik
Last Team: Dynamo Moscow (KHL)

Number: 77
Position: Defenceman
Height: 5’11”/180 cm
Weight: 225 lbs/100 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: October 10, 1972 in Kiev, UKR
Drafted: Selected by the Los Angeles Kings in 4th round (81st overall) of the 1991 Entry Draft

Strengths: Zhitnik was one of the best all-around defencemen of the last two decades. He had great mobility on the ice and usually played against the opposing teams’ top lines. Zhitnik was also a good playmaker and point man on the powerplay.

Weaknesses: Zhitnik’s speed, physical play and defensive reliability had been declining in his last few seasons. When attacking, he was prone to making risky plays leading to turnovers.

Biography: Born in Kiev, Zhitnik developed into a hockey player with the Sokol sports club. At age 18, he drew attention from the NHL due to his speed and strength (Zhitnik was nicknamed “elephant” because of his powerful legs) and was drafted by the Los Angeles Kings. Like the majority of especially talented and promising young hockey players in the Soviet Union, Alexei was transferred to the Central Red Army team in Moscow. He played well enough to play not only at the 1992 World Junior Championship, but also at the Olympics in the same year. At both tournaments, Russia (or CIS, as it was known then) won gold. In the summer of that year, Zhitnik made the shocking transition from Russian life, where foreign jeans were a luxury, to sunny southern California. In his first season in the NHL, Alexei’s team (led by superstar Wayne Gretzky) made it all the way to the Stanley Cup final, but lost to the Montreal Canadiens. After another season and a half in L.A., Zhitnik was traded to the Sabres. He continued to be involved with the national team, being called to represent Russia at the 1996 World Championship (where he was named the tournament’s best defenceman), the 1996 World Cup, and the 1998 Olympics (where Russia won silver). In Buffalo, Zhitnik was one the pillars of the Sabres’ rise in the late 1990s. Alexei once again came short of being a Stanley Cup champion when the Sabres lost to the Dallas Stars in the 1999 playoff finals. In 1999 and 2002, he was invited to play at the NHL All-Star Game. Zhitnik joined fellow stars Ilya Kovalchuk, Alexei Kovalev and Nikolai Khabibulin in playing for Ak Bars Kazan during the 2004-05 NHL lockout. He did not return to the Sabres when the NHL resumed, signing instead with the New York Islanders. Although he was still a reliable minute-eating defenceman, Zhitnik was traded twice in the 2006-07 season, moving from the Islanders to the Flyers to the Thrashers. In 2007, when he was a Flyer, Zhitnik became the first Soviet-born defenseman to play 1000 games in the NHL. In 2008, Atlanta bought out the remaining year of his contract and Alexei returned to Russia to play for Moscow Dynamo. That year, Zhitnik played for the national team for the first time in eight years, captaining Russia at the Karjala Cup tournament of the Euro Hockey Tour. He was named captain of Dynamo for the 2009-10 season. This was Zhitnik’s last season of playing hockey.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1989-90 Sokol Kiev 31 3 4 7 16
1990-91 Sokol Kiev 46 1 4 5 46
1991-92 CSKA Moscow 44 2 7 9 52
1992-93 Los Angeles 78 12 36 48 -3 80
1993-94 Los Angeles 81 12 40 52 -11 101
1994-95 Los Angeles/Buffalo 32 4 10 14 -6 61
1995-96 Buffalo 80 6 30 36 -25 58
1996-97 Buffalo 80 7 28 35 +10 95
1997-98 Buffalo 78 15 30 45 +19 102
1998-99 Buffalo 81 7 26 33 -6 96
1999-00 Buffalo 74 2 11 13 -6 95
2000-01 Buffalo 78 8 29 37 -3 75
2001-02 Buffalo 82 1 33 34 -1 80
2002-03 Buffalo 70 3 18 21 -5 85
2003-04 Buffalo 68 4 24 28 -13 102
2004-05 Ak Bars Kazan 23 1 8 9 30
2005-06 N.Y. Islanders 59 5 24 29 +4 88
2006-07 N.Y.I./Philadelphia/Atlanta 79 7 31 38 +1 92
2007-08 Atlanta 83 5 17 22 -4 72
2008-09 Dynamo Moscow 56 4 12 16 0 58
2009-10 Dynamo Moscow 56 0 7 7 +2 60
Totals USSR/RHL/KHL Reg. Season 256 11 42 53 262
Totals RHL/KHL Playoffs 16 1 2 3 24
Totals NHL Reg. Season 1085 96 375 471 -53 1268
Totals NHL Playoffs 98 9 30 39 -33 168

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1990 European U18 6 2 2 4 2
1991 World U20 7 1 1 2 2
1991 Canada Cup 5 0 0 0 4
1992 World U20 7 1 1 2 2
1992 Olympic Games 8 1 0 1 0
1992 World Championship 6 0 2 2 6
1994 World Championship 6 1 2 1 8
1996 World Championship 8 1 1 2 6
1996 World Cup 3 0 1 1 2
1998 Olympic Games 6 0 2 2 2
2000 World Championship 6 0 1 1 2
Totals U18 Level 6 2 2 4 2
Totals U20 Level 14 2 2 4 4
Totals Senior Level 48 3 9 12 30

Photo Gallery:




Welcome to Russkiy Hockey! This website is dedicated to the most talented Russian hockey players who bring a different game to the NHL - a game of speed, creativity, and discipline. On this site you can find out about the careers and accomplishments of these athletes, as well as about the history of Russian hockey, the latest stats of Russian hockey players, and the national team's successes at international tournaments. Enjoy your visit!

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