Archive Page 2

20
May
12

2012 World Championship

Host Cities: Helsinki, Finland and Stockholm, Sweden
May 4-20, 2012
RESULT: GOLD MEDAL

No matter how talented a roster Russia gathers for every World Championship, there are always concerns about team chemistry, defense, and discipline. From 2007 to 2011 under coach Slava Bykov, Russia won two gold medals, one silver, and one bronze. However, Russia’s 4th place finish in 2011 was an obvious disappointment and led the Russian Hockey Federation to replace Bykov with accomplished Ak Bars Kazan coach Zinetula Bilyaletdinov. The new coach brought back only seven players from the 2011 team and invited ten debutants, including Traktor star Evgeni Kuznetsov, Ak Bars defenseman Evgeni Medvedev, and Omsk winger Alexander Popov. The team was captained by veteran defenseman Ilya Nikulin and led offensively by NHL stars Evgeni Malkin and Pavel Datsyuk. Colorado Avalanche goalie Semyon Varlamov was tasked with the bulk of the goaltending duties and was backed by Konstantin Barulin. Russia won all of its round-robin games, including a 7-3 comeback win over Sweden after trailing 3-0. Malkin had instant chemistry with wingers Popov and Perezhogin, with the trio combining for  19 goals and 40 points. Russia’s only black mark was the suspension of defensemen Emelin and Kalinin for unsportsmanlike play in the game against Czech Republic. However, the team was strengthened by the arrival of Alexanders Ovechkin and Semin for the playoff round. The duo was centred by Datsyuk and even outshined Malkin’s line in the elimination games. Since the 1980s, Russia has never so easily and confidently cruised to a gold medal victory. The usually pesky and difficult Finns were no match for Russia in the semifinal, even on their home ice in Helsinki! Russia faced the spirited Slovaks in the final. The Slovak captain Zdeno Chara opened the scoring, but then all four of Russia’s lines contributed for a 6-2 routing. Although Malkin with his 11-goal performance won the tournament MVP award and both him and Nikulin were named to the tournament all-star team, none of Bilyaletdinov’s selections looked out of place at this tournament. The team was greeted with euphoria as they brought Russia’s third World Championship trophy in five years to Moscow.

Game 1: Russia 5 – Latvia 2
Goals: Nikulin (Perezhogin, Malkin), Malkin (Nikulin), Malkin (Popov), Popov (Perezhogin, Kalinin), Kuznetsov (Kulemin) – Indrasis (Galvins, Sprukts), Daugavins (Pujacs, Bartulis)
Shots: Russia 40 – Latvia 26
Saves: Varlamov 24 – Masalskis 35
PIM: Russia 8 – Latvia 6

Game 2: Russia 4 – Norway 2
Goals: Datsyuk (Kalinin, Emelin), Denisov (Medvedev, Kuznetsov), Kulemin (Malkin), Perezhogin (Malkin) – Ask (Holos, Thoresen), Holtet (Skroder, Holos)
Shots: Russia 46 – Norway 21
Saves: Varlamov 19 – Volden 42
PIM: Russia 8 – Norway 10

Game 3: Russia 2 – Germany 0
Goals: Zherdev (Medvedev, Malkin), Tereshchenko (Shirokov, Zherdev)
Shots: Russia 26 – Germany 30
Saves: Varlamov 30 – Kotschnew 24
PIM: Russia 10 – Germany 10

Game 4: Russia 3 – Denmark 1
Goals: Medvedev (Shirokov, Zherdev), Malkin (Perezhogin, Nikulin), Kalinin (Kuznetsov, Shirokov) – Eller
Shots: Russia 52 – Denmark 36
Saves: Barulin 35 – Nielsen 49
PIM: Russia 2 – Denmark 6

Game 5: Russia 7 – Sweden 3
Goals: Popov (Malkin), Malkin (Biryukov, Kuznetsov), Emelin (Datsyuk, Kalinin), Perezhogin (Medvedev), Malkin (Popov), Malkin (Popov), Denisov (Malkin, Popov) – Karlsson (Stalberg, Alfredsson), Zetterberg (Alfredsson, Eriksson), Franzen (Eriksson, Zetterberg)
Shots: Russia 36 – Sweden 46
Saves: Varlamov 43 – Fasth 29
PIM: Russia 37 – Sweden 10

Game 6: Russia 2 – Czech Republic 0
Goals: Perezhogin (Nikulin), Malkin (Popov)
Shots: Russia 23 – Czech Republic 30
Saves: Barulin 30 – Kovar 21
PIM: Russia 8 – Czech Republic 8

Game 7: Russia 4 – Italy 0
Goals: Datsyuk (Kuznetsov), Kuznetsov (Kulemin, Nikitin), Biryukov (Malkin, Perezhogin), Popov (Perezhogin)
Shots: Russia 40 – Italy 29
Saves: Varlamov 21/21, Barulin 8/8 – Tragust 36
PIM: Russia 2 – Italy 4

Quarterfinal: Russia 5 – Norway 2
Goals: Ovechkin (Semin), Popov (Emelin, Ryasenski), Emelin (Datsyuk, Semin), Zherdev (Biryukov, Tereshchenko), Nikulin, Malkin – Skroder (Hansen, Thoresen), Thoresen (Ask, Holos)
Shots: Russia 45 – Norway 21
Saves: Varlamov 19 – Haugen 40
PIM: Russia 2 – Norway 8

Semifinal: Russia 6 – Finland 2
Goals: Malkin (Nikitin, Popov), Malkin (Zherdev, Shirokov), Ovechkin (Denisov, Popov), Malkin (Nikulin), Kokarev (Kulemin), Shirokov (Biryukov, Nikitin) – Niakala (Kontiola, Joensuu), Granlund (Jarvinen, Koivu)
Shots: Russia 23 – Finland 31
Saves: Varlamov 29 – Vehanen 17
PIM: Russia 4 – Finland 8

Final: Russia 6 – Slovakia 2
Goals: Semin (Ovechkin, Datsyuk), Perezhogin (Popov), Tereshchenko (Shirokov, Zherdev), Semin (Datsyuk), Datsyuk (Semin, Zherdev), Malkin (Nikulin, Nikitin) – Zhara (Surovy), Chara (Surovy, Satan)
Shots: Russia 42 – Slovakia 31
Saves: Varlamov 29 – Laco 28/33, Hamerlik 8/9
PIM: Russia 2 – Slovakia 4

Team Stats:

Player GP G A PTS +/- PIM
D #5 Ilya Nikulin (C) 10 2 5 7 +10 8
D #6 Denis Denisov 10 2 1 3 +5 2
D #7 Dmitri Kalinin 5 1 3 4 +6 25
D #12 Nikita Nikitin 10 0 4 4 +4 4
D #48 Evgeni Biryukov 7 1 3 4 +9 4
D #74 Alexei Emelin 9 2 2 4 +12 4
D #77 Evgeni Ryasenski 7 0 1 1 +3 0
D #82 Evgeni Medvedev 10 1 3 4 +4 4
F #8 Alexander Ovechkin 3 2 2 4 +5 2
F #11 Evgeni Malkin 10 11 8 19 +16 4
F #13 Pavel Datsyuk 10 3 4 7 +7 2
F #15 Alexander Svitov (A) 10 0 0 0 0 4
F #19 Denis Kokarev 10 1 0 1 0 4
F #24 Alexander Popov 10 4 8 12 +15 2
F #27 Alexei Tereshchenko (A) 10 2 1 3 +2 2
F #28 Alexander Semin 3 2 3 5 +4 0
F #37 Alexander Perezhogin 10 4 5 9 +16 4
F #41 Nikolai Kulemin 10 1 3 4 +4 0
F #52 Sergei Shirokov 10 1 5 6 +2 2
F #80 Evgeni Ketov 7 0 0 0 0 0
F #92 Evgeni Kuznetsov 10 2 4 6 +3 4
F #93 Nikolai Zherdev 10 2 4 6 +3 2
Goaltender GP W L GAA Save % SO
G #1 Semyon Varlamov 8 8 0 1.77 93.9 1
G #30 Konstantin Barulin 2 2 0 0.50 98.5 1
G 40 Mikhail Biryukov 1 0 0 0.00 100.0 0

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18
Mar
12

Viktor Kozlov

Full name: Viktor Nikolaevich Kozlov
Team: CSKA Moscow (KHL)
Number: 38
Position: Center
Height: 6’4”/195 cm
Weight: 227 lbs/106 kg
Shoots: Right
Born: February 14, 1975 in Togliatti, RUS
Drafted: Selected by San Jose Sharks in 1st round (6th overall) of the 1993 Entry Draft

Strengths: Viktor Kozlov is a tall, versatile forward who can easily play in all three forward positions and log many minutes of ice time. Kozlov has great reach and is very skilled with the puck. He is a natural leader on and off the ice.

Weaknesses: In the NHL, Kozlov was a very streaky player. For his high skill level, he has not dominated as could be expected. Also, Kozlov does not always use his size well in physical battles.

Biography: Viktor Kozlov comes from Russia’s automotive capital, Togliatti, where hockey is the number one passion. So it was no surprise that the tall and lanky son of a crane operator made his way through the local hockey school and debuted for Togliatti’s team in the Soviet league, Lada, at the age of 16. At age 17, he moved to the capital to train with Moscow Dynamo. In Kozlov’s first full season with Dynamo in 1993, his team won the Russian championship. Kozlov played another year and a half in Moscow under coach Petr Vorobiev before making the move across the ocean to play for the NHL team that drafted him, the San Jose Sharks. A few days before leaving to San Jose, Kozlov broke his leg in a Dynamo game and took several months to heal before making his NHL debut. Being in a new country and not knowing English, Viktor lived with Sharks goalie Arturs Irbe. Kozlov reportedly finished the 1995 season with the Sharks’ farm club because of a joke he made that the Sharks’ humourless coach did not appreciate. Kozlov did not live up to full expectations playing for the Sharks, but became a real star and productive forward after being traded to the Florida Panthers in 1998. In Florida, Kozlov centered Pavel Bure. In two of their seasons playing together, Bure led the NHL in goal scoring. The two were also invited to play in the NHL All-Star Game in 2000. Kozlov remained a leader for the Panthers until being traded to New Jersey in 2004. That year, the NHL locked out its players, so Kozlov spent a year back in Russia playing for his hometown Lada. Back in the NHL, Viktor had three productive years from 2006 to 2009, first setting a career-high in goals playing for the New York Islanders, and then next season setting a career high in plus/minus playing for the Washington Capitals with fellow Russian stars Alex Ovechkin, Alex Semin, and Sergei Fedorov. In 2009, Kozlov signed a three-year contract with Salavat Yulaev Ufa in Russia’s KHL. Kozlov remained productive, mostly centering Alexander Radulov. In 2011, the team won the KHL’s Gagarin Cup as playoff champions. In 2012, Kozlov joined the new Lokomotiv Yaroslavl team and was later traded to CSKA Moscow. Kozlov has represented Russia in many world championships and in the 2006 and 2010 Olympics. He has a silver and a bronze medal from the European Junior Championship in the early 1990s and was part of the bronze medal-winning team in 2005 and the silver medal-winning team in 2010 at the World Championship.

Club Stats:

Season Team

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

1990-91 Lada-2 Togliatti (USSR-2)

2

2

0

2

0

1991-92 Lada Togliatti

3

0

0

0

0

1992-93 Dynamo Moscow

30

6

5

11

4

1993-94 Dynamo Moscow

42

16

9

25

14

1994-95 Dynamo Moscow

3

1

1

2

2

1994-95 Kansas City (IHL)

4

1

1

2

0

1994-95 San Jose

16

2

0

2

-5

2

1995-96 Kansas City (IHL)

15

4

7

11

12

1995-96 San Jose

62

6

13

19

-15

6

1996-97 San Jose

78

16

25

41

-16

40

1997-98 San Jose/Florida

64

17

13

30

-3

16

1998-99 Florida

65

16

35

51

+13

24

1999-00 Florida

80

17

53

70

+24

16

2000-01 Florida

51

14

23

37

-4

10

2001-02 Florida

50

9

18

27

-16

20

2002-03 Florida

74

22

34

56

-8

18

2003-04 Florida/New Jersey

59

13

20

33

-4

18

2004-05 Lada Togliatti

52

15

22

37

22

2005-06 New Jersey

69

12

13

25

0

+16

2006-07 N.Y. Islanders

81

25

26

51

+12

28

2007-08 Washington

81

16

38

54

+28

18

2008-09 Washington

67

13

28

41

-9

16

2009-10 Salavat Yulaev Ufa

48

10

18

28

+7

43

2010-11 Salavat Yulaev Ufa

48

17

15

32

+8

14

2011-12 Salavat Yulaev Ufa

36

10

16

26

-2

8

2012-13 Lokomotiv/CSKA

27

2

5

7

-2

14

Totals RHL/KHL Reg. Season

278

77

91

168

121

Totals RHL/KHL Playoffs

74

17

16

33

14

Totals NHL Reg. Season

897

198

339

537

-3

248

Totals NHL Playoffs

35

4

8

12

-6

10

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

1991 European U18

6

3

3

6

2

1992 European U18

6

3

3

6

4

1993 World U20

7

2

1

3

2

1996 World   Championship

8

0

3

3

0

1998 World   Championship

6

4

5

9

0

2000 World   Championship

6

1

3

4

2

2004 World   Cup

4

1

0

1

0

2005 World   Championship

9

0

1

1

0

2006 Olympic   Games

8

2

3

5

2

2010 Olympic Games

4

1

0

1

0

2010 World Championship

9

1

2

3

2

Totals U18 Level

12

6

6

12

6

Totals U20 Level

7

2

1

3

2

Totals Senior Level

54

10

17

27

6

Photo Gallery:

07
Jan
12

2012 World Junior Championship

Host Cities: Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
December 26, 2011 – January 5, 2012
RESULT: SILVER MEDAL

One year after winning the gold medal in an exhilarating comeback against Canada, Russia came to these world juniors with almost an entirely new roster, with team captain Evgeni Kuznetsov being the only returning player. Coach Valeri Bragin included a record six players from the Canadian junior leagues on the team, including the potential no. 1 NHL draft pick Nail Yakupov. Russia began the tournament on a confident note, giving up only one goal in its first three games and destroying Latvia 14-0. In this game, Kuznetsov came one point short of tying Peter Forsberg’s record for the most points (ten) in a single world junior championship game. Leading Sweden 3-0 in its following game, Russia collapsed in the third period and lost 4-3 in overtime, forcing the team to play a quarterfinal match against the Czechs. The quarterfinal featured the best goaltending battle of the tournament with 17-year old Andrei Vasilevski and Czech goalie Petr Mrazek both putting on world-class performances. After eliminating the Czechs in a tight victory, Russia had to face a relaxed Canada in the semifinal the next day. Russia’s fatigue didn’t factor until the third period, as the team took a commanding 6-1 lead with only 12 minutes left to play and garbage being thrown on the ice by the disappointed Canadian fans. That was when Canada launched one of the most amazing comeback attempts in the history of Russia-Canada confrontations. The team in red scored four goals in the span of five minutes, forcing the excellent Vasilevski to be replaced in net by Andrei Makarov. Canada worked until the final second to try tie the game, but Russia held on to win 6-5. Given that Russia was outshot by more than a 2-1 margin, it is fair to say that goaltending once again saved the team. Facing Sweden for the gold medal, Russia clearly had not physically or mentally recovered from the semifinal. It took the Russian offense 13 minutes to register a single shot on goal. Sweden had nearly total puck control and fired a whopping 58 shots on Makarov, but the scoreless game did not truly open up until the final ten minutes, when both teams launched one dangerous attack after another. Sweden dominated the overtime period and deservedly won the game after a Russian turnover enabled Mika Zibanejad to face Makarov one-on-one and score the game’s only goal. Sweden’s win was its first world junior gold medal in 31 years. It was unfortunate that Russia did not find its usual up-tempo game, but given that most of its players were just 17 and 18 years old, they will have another chance to fight for gold next year on home ice. After the game, Kuznetsov was named the tournament MVP, best forward, and member of the media all-star team.

Game 1: Russia 3 – Switzerland 0
Goals: Khokhlachev, Gusev (Kosov, Grigorenko), Grigorenko (Kucherov, Gusev)
Shots: Russia 30 – Switzerland 40
Saves: Vasilevski 40 – Wof 27
PIM: Russia 8 – Switzerland 6

Game 2: Russia 3 – Slovakia 1
Goals: Ozhiganov (Yakupov, Kosov), Naumenkov (Zemchenko), Kucherov (Grigorenko, Nesterov) – Bubela
Shots: Russia 40 – Slovakia 32
Saves: Makarov 31 – Simboch 37
PIM: Russia 20 – Slovakia 2

Game 3: Russia 14 – Latvia 0
Goals: Grigorenko (Kucherov, Gusev), Sergeyev (Yakupov, Arzamastsev), Kuznetsov (Yakupov, Antipin), Kuznetsov (Gusev, Nesterov), Zheldakov (Kuznetsov, Gusev), Gusev (Kuznetsov, Nesterov), Gusev (Kucherov, Kuznetsov), Kulikov (Kuznetsov, Zemchenko), Khokhlachev (Yakupov, Naumenkov), Kuznetsov (Gusev, Kucherov), Zemchenko (Kulikov, Kuznetsov), Kosov (Apalkov, Barbashev), Khokhlachev (Telegin, Antipin), Nesterov (Gusev, Kuznetsov)
Shots: Russia 50 – Latvia 30
Saves: Vasilevski 30 – Merzlikins 36
PIM: Russia 10 – Latvia 10

Game 4: Russia 3 – Sweden 4 (OT)
Goals: Zemchenko (Yakupov), Kosov (Barbashev, Apalkov), Telegin – Klefbom (Larsson), Rakell (Nemeth, Larsson), Friberg (Brodin, Nordstrom), Nordstrom (Nemeth, Friberg)
Shots: Russia 26 – Sweden 55
Saves: Vasilevski 51 – Gustafsson 23
PIM: Russia 16 – Sweden 4

Quarterfinal: Russia 2 – Czech Republic 1
Goals: Apalkov (Barbashev, Arzamastsev), Zheldakov (Kucherov) – Culek (Hertl, Jaskin)
Shots: Russia 45 – Czech Republic 39
Saves: Vasilevski 38 – Mrazek 43
PIM: Russia 4 – Czech Republic 2

Semifinal: Russia 6 – Canada 5
Goals: Kuznetsov (Yakupov), Nesterov (Zheldakov), Kuznetsov (Khokhlachev, Yakupov), Kuznetsov (Yakupov, Sergeyev), Khokhlachev (Kuznetsov, Yakupov), Kucherov (Grigorenko, Zemchenko) – Connolly (Hamilton, Huberdeau), Hamilton (Sheifele, Strome), Schwartz (Gallagher), Gallagher (Hamilton), Gormley (Gallagher)
Shots: Russia 24 – Canada 56
Saves: Vasilevski 44/49, Makarov 7/7 – Wedgewood 9/13, Visentin 9/11
PIM: Russia 16 – Canada 54

Final: Sweden 1 (OT) – Russia 0
Goals: Zibanejad (Nemeth)
Shots: Sweden 58 – Russia 17
Saves: Gustafsson 17 – Makarov 57
PIM: Sweden 4 – Russia 8

Team Stats:

Player GP G A PTS +/- PIM
D #3   Artyom Sergeyev 7 1 1 2 +1 12
D #4   Viktor Antipin 7 0 2 2 +5 2
D #6   Mikhail Naumenkov 7 1 1 2 +2 8
D #7   Igor Ozhiganov 7 1 0 1 +3 4
D #12 Grigori Zheldakov 7 2 1 3 +6 4
D #24 Zakhar Arzamastsev 7 0 2 2 +2 2
D #26 Ildar   Isangulov 6 0 0 0 +2 6
D #29   Nikita Nesterov 7 2 3 5 +7 6
F #8   Nikita Gusev 7 3 6 9 +5 0
F #9   Nikita Kucherov 7 2 5 7 +4 2
F #10   Nail Yakupov 7 0 9 9 +4 6
F #14   Daniil Apalkov 7 1 2 3 +2 0
F #15   Pavel Kulikov 7 1 1 2 +3 2
F #16   Ignat Zemchenko 7 2 3 5 +4 2
F #17   Mikhail Grigorenko 6 2 3 5 +2 0
F #18   Yaroslav Kosov 7 2 2 4 +5 0
F #19   Alexander Khokhlachev 7 4 1 5 +5 6
F #22   Sergei Barbashev 7 0 3 3 +2 0
F #23   Ivan Telegin 6 1 1 2 0 12
F #25   Evgeni Kuznetsov (C) 7 6 7 13 +6 4
Goaltender GP W L GAA Save % SO
G #1   Sergei Kostenko 0 0 0 0 0 0
G #20   Andrei Makarov 3 1 1 0.88 97.9 0
G #30   Andrei Vasilevski 5 4 1 2.01 95.3 2

Photo Gallery:

11
Dec
11

Semyon Varlamov

Full name: Semyon Aleksandrovich Varlamov
Team: Colorado Avalanche
Number: 1
Position: Goaltender
Height: 6’2”/189 cm
Weight: 209 lbs/95 kg
Catches: Left
Born: April 27, 1988 in Samara, RUS
Drafted: Selected by the Washington Capitals in the 1st round (23rd overall) of the 2006 Entry Draft

Strengths: Varlamov is a prototypical butterfly-style goaltender with excellent reflexes, flexibility, and size. Varlamov has a very good save percentage early into his NHL career and is developing into a long-term no. 1 goaltender.

Weaknesses: Injuries and inconsistency had prevented Varlamov from playing a full NHL season until his fourth season. Varlamov’s puckhandling skills are his main weakness.

Biography:  Semyon Varlamov was born in Samara (then still known as Kuybyshev) – an industrial city on the Volga. After moving to Yaroslavl, a city further up the Volga, Varlamov developed into the best goalie prospect in his age group with the Lokomotiv hockey organization. Playing his way through the farm league, Varlamov debuted in the Superleague at the age of 18 and quickly became Lokomotiv’s number one goaltender. In 2007, Varlamov was Russia’s goaltender at the World Junior Championship and helped the team to a silver medal finish. Even before then, he was already drafted by the Washington Capitals and had good NHL potential. After two successful seasons in the Superleague, Semyon came to North America to play for Washington’s farm club. Throughout the regular season of 2008-09, he was called up to the big club a few times and proved to be effective, winning 4 of 6 games. The average play of Capitals starting goalie Jose Theodore prompted the club to entrust Varlamov with the goaltending duties for the playoffs. Varlamov was excellent, registering two shutouts in the first round against the Rangers. The Capitals were ultimately eliminated by the Penguins in game 7 of the second round, but Varlamov had left his mark as the team’s prospective no. 1 starter. Semyon continued collecting victories in the next season, but an injury two months in forced him to undergo a conditioning stint with the farm club. Varlamov regained his position towards the end of the season, but the Capitals only lasted one playoff round. In 2010, Varlamov was named to Russia’s Olympic team, but did not see any ice time. Semyon’s chance to shine for the national team came at the 2010 World Championship, where he went undefeated until Russia’s tight loss to the Czechs in the final. Semyon spent his third NHL season mostly as the backup to fellow young goalie Michal Neuvirth. However, Varlamov was selected to start in the 2011 Winter Classic outdoor game against the Penguins. In Washington, Varlamov was one of three Russians, along with Alexander Ovechkin and Alexander Semin, to have a strong fan following. He even starred in a humorous ad with Ovechkin. In the 2011 off-season, the Capitals decided to go in a different direction with their goaltending and traded Varlamov to the Colorado Avalanche. In Colorado, Varlamov is starting in a lot more games than he did in Washington, but also has a more fragile and younger team in front of him. In 2012, Varlamov once again was the main goaltender for Russia at the World Championship. This time, Varlamov won all 8 games that he started, including the gold-medal final. For the duration of the 2012-13 NHL lockout, Varlamov returned to play for the club that developed him, Lokomotiv, and put up outstanding numbers.

Club Stats:

Season Team

GP

W

L

T

OL

GAA

Save %

SO

2004-05 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

8

2.43

1

2005-06 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

33

2.02

8

2006-07 Lokomotiv-2 Yaroslavl (RHL-3)

2

1.50

0

2006-07 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

33

2.17

3

2007-08 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

44

2.45

3

2008-09 Hershey (AHL)

27

19

7

1

2.40

92.0

2

2008-09 Washington

6

4

0

1

2.37

91.8

0

2009-10 Hershey (AHL)

3

3

0

0

1.95

93.3

0

2009-10 Washington

26

15

4

6

2.55

90.9

2

2010-11 Hershey (AHL)

3

2

1

0

3.36

85.5

0

2010-11 Washington

27

11

9

5

2.23

92.4

2

2011-12 Colorado

53

26

24

3

2.59

91.3

4

2012-13 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

16

8

4

3

1.74

94.6

3

2012-13 Colorado

35

11

21

3

3.02

90.3

3

Totals RHL/KHL Reg. Season

77

2.23

6

Totals RHL Playoffs

22

2.00

5

Totals NHL Reg. Season

147

67

58

18

2.61

91.2

11

Totals NHL Playoffs

19

10

9

2.49

91.5

2

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament

GP

W

L

T

GAA

SO

2005 World U18

2

2

0

0

3.52

0

2005 World U18

2

2

0

0

2.50

0

2006 World U20

1

1

0

0

1.00

0

2007 World U20

6

5

1

0

1.51

2

2010 Olympic Games

0

0

0

0

0

0

2010 World Championship

5

4

1

0

1.41

1

2012 World Championship

8

8

0

0

1.77

1

2013 World Championship

4

2

1

0

3.59

0

Totals U18 Level

4

4

0

0

3.01

0

Totals U20 Level

7

6

1

0

1.44

2

Totals Senior Level

17

14

2

0

2.09

2

Photo Gallery:

13
Nov
11

Nikolai Kulemin

Full name: Nikolai Vladimirovich Kulemin
Team: Toronto Maple Leafs

Number: 41
Position: Left Wing
Height: 6’1”/186 cm
Weight: 220 lbs/100 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: July 14, 1986 in Magnitogorsk, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Toronto Maple Leafs in 2nd round (44th overall) of the 2006 Entry Draft

Strengths: Kulemin is an effective defensively-responsible forward with plenty of speed, grit, and a heavy shot. He rarely gives up fighting for the puck, fits in well on any line he is assigned to, and is reliable in any situation in the game.

Weaknesses: While Kulemin has proved that he is a 30-goal scorer, he sometimes falls into long dry spells throughout the season. He doesn’t seem to take as many shots on net as he is capable of.

Biography: Like his friend and fellow NHL star Evgeni Malkin, Nikolai Kulemin was born and raised in the steelmaking city of Magnitogorsk in the southern Ural Mountains. As a teenager, Kulemin developed with the local Metallurg hockey school and made it to the professional league at the age of 17. In 2004, Kulemin was a member of Russia’s team that won gold at the under-18 championship. In his third professional season, Kulemin was transferred to Magnitogorsk’s main club, which played in the Russian Superleague. The 2006-07 season was a breakthrough year for Nikolai. Not only did his Metallurg win the Superleague championship, but he was also named the league MVP after tallying 27 goals in 54 games. After one more productive season in Russia, Kulemin moved on to play in the NHL for the Toronto Maple Leafs, the team that had drafted him in 2006. Nikolai became one of the few players in Leafs history to score in his first NHL game – it was the gamewinning goal against the Detroit Red Wings. Nikolai’s adjustment to North American hockey and life was eased by the presence of three other Russian speakers on the Maple Leafs – Nikolai Antropov, Alexei Ponikarovsky, and Mikhail Grabovski. Towards the end of the 2009-10 season, Kulemin was promoted to his team’s first line with sniper Phil Kessel and centre Tyler Bozak. In 2010-11, Kulemin emerged as the Leafs’ hardest working player and one of the league’s best two-way forwards. His line with Grabovski and Clarke MacArthur was the team’s most consistent and also arguably the NHL’s most productive second line. Nikolai also broke the 30-goal mark for the first time in his career. In just his fourth NHL season, Nikolai is already the longest-tenured player in Toronto. Kulemin has also played for Russia in five world championship tournaments and has won silver and bronze medals, as well as the gold medal in 2012. During the 2012-13 NHL lockout, Nikolai returned to his hometown to play for Metallurg. Playing on a line with Evgeni Malkin and Sergei Mozyakin, Kulemin scored at more than a point-per-game rate. He returned rejuvenated to Toronto and helped the Leafs make the playoffs for the first time in eight seasons.

Club Stats:

Season Team

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

2003-04 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

43

8

18

26

91

2004-05 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

43

9

13

22

44

2005-06 Metallurg-2 Magnitogorsk (RHL-3)

4

3

1

3

6

2005-06 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

31

5

7

12

8

2006-07 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

54

27

12

39

42

2007-08 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

57

21

12

33

63

2008-09 Toronto (AHL)

5

0

0

0

0

2008-09 Toronto

73

15

16

31

-8

18

2009-10 Toronto

78

16

20

36

0

16

2010-11 Toronto

82

30

27

57

+7

26

2011-12 Toronto

70

7

21

28

+2

6

2012-13 Metallurg Magnitogorsk

36

14

24

38

+25

26

2012-13 Toronto

48

7

16

23

-5

22

Totals RHL/KHL Reg. Season

178

67

55

122

139

Totals RHL Playoffs

37

14

7

21

45

Totals NHL Reg. Season

351

75

100

175

-4

88

Totals NHL Playoffs

7

0

1

1

-9

0

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

2004 World U18

6

0

2

2

2

2006 World U20

4

4

2

6

25

2006 World Championship

7

1

3

4

2

2007 World Championship

9

2

1

3

0

2010 World Championship

9

3

2

5

25

2011 World Championship

9

1

0

1

2

2012 World Championship 10 1 3 4 0
Totals U18 Level

6

0

2

2

2

Totals U20 Level

4

4

2

6

25

Totals Senior Level

44

8

9

17

29

Photo Gallery:




Welcome to Russkiy Hockey! This website is dedicated to the most talented Russian hockey players who bring a different game to the NHL - a game of speed, creativity, and discipline. On this site you can find out about the careers and accomplishments of these athletes, as well as about the history of Russian hockey, the latest stats of Russian hockey players, and the national team's successes at international tournaments. Enjoy your visit!

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