Archive for the 'Retired' Category



13
Oct
10

Alexei Yashin

Full name: Alexei Valerievich Yashin
Last Team: CSKA Moscow (KHL)

Number: 19
Position: Center
Height: 6’3″/190 cm
Weight: 217 lbs/99 kg
Shoots: Right
Born: November 5, 1973 in Ekaterinburg, RUS
Drafted: Selected by the Ottawa Senators in the 1st round (2nd overall) of the 1992 Entry Draft

Strengths: Yashin was a leader on the ice, patiently orchestrating attacks on the opponent’s net. He had great puck handling skills and in his prime had one of the most dangerous shots in the NHL. At his peak, he was an elite, game-breaking talent.

Weaknesses: Throughout his NHL career, Yashin gained a reputation as an under-achiever, largely because of his hefty contract with the Islanders. Yashin drew criticism for his lack of commitment to the defensive game.

Biography: While growing up in the Urals, Alexei Yashin played hockey for fun with his friend Nikolai Khabibulin. Obviously, Alexei was the shooter and Nikolai was the goalie. Alexei had such a wicked shot that he nearly tore down Khabibulin’s apartment! Yashin’s career began with Avtomobilist Sverdlovsk. In 1991, he was promoted to Dynamo Moscow and impressed many hockey scouts. He was the unexpected second overall pick in the 1992 NHL Entry Draft. When he joined the Ottawa Senators, he quickly became a star. Having had an excellent rookie season, Alexei was compared to Mario Lemieux. After a couple of average seasons, Alexei broke through in the 1998-99 with 94 points. He was the runner for the NHL’s Hart Trophy (most valuable player). This was followed by a major contract dispute with the Senators. Yashin had to sit out the 1999-00 season and lost his status as a fan favourite player in Ottawa. The next year Alexei returned with another great season despite being paid much less. Still, fans booed him. Yashin was traded in 2001 to the last-place New York Islanders. He signed a record conract worth $90 million. Alexei was a key reason for the Islanders’ improvement, which included playoff appearances in three consecutive years. When invited, Alexei always plays for Russia at international tournaments, where he has won two Olympic medals (silver in 1998 and bronze in 2002). Yashin also played in the World Cups of 1996 and 2004 and in numerous  World Championships (including in 1993, when Russia won gold). He has also appeared in four NHL All-Star Games. During the NHL lockout, almost no European team could handle the insurance required for Yashin’s NHL contract. Eventually, he joined Lokomotiv in Yaroslavl and had 10 points in 9 playoff games. Alexei played for two more seasons on Long Island before the Islanders bought out the remainder of his contract. As a free agent, Yashin returned to Lokomotiv in 2007 and helped lead the team to the playoff final for two straight years. With the creation of the Kontinental Hockey League, Yashin became one of the league’s top attractions and captained the Russian team in the KHL All-Star Game. In 2009, Alexei signed with SKA St. Petersburg, where he had one excellent point-per-game season followed by a mediocre season. In 2011, Yashin came close to returning to the New York Islanders, but ultimately signed with CSKA Moscow. After one season with the Red Army club, Yashin has currently yet to find a team to continue playing hockey for.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1990-91 Avtomobilist Sverdlovsk 26 2 1 3 10
1991-92 Dynamo Moscow 35 7 5 12 19
1992-93 Dynamo Moscow 27 10 12 22 18
1993-94 Ottawa 83 30 49 79 -49 22
1994-95 Las Vegas (IHL) 24 15 20 35 32
1994-95 Ottawa 47 21 23 44 -20 20
1995-96 CSKA Moscow 4 2 2 4 4
1995-96 Ottawa 46 15 24 39 -15 28
1996-97 Ottawa 82 35 40 75 -7 44
1997-98 Ottawa 82 33 39 72 +6 24
1998-99 Ottawa 82 44 50 94 +16 54
2000-01 Ottawa 82 40 48 88 +10 30
2001-02 NY Islanders 78 32 43 75 -3 25
2002-03 NY Islanders 81 26 39 65 -12 32
2003-04 NY Islanders 47 15 19 34 -1 10
2004-05 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl 10 3 3 6 +4 14
2005-06 NY Islanders 82 28 38 66 -14 68
2006-07 NY Islanders 58 18 32 50 +6 44
2007-08 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl 56 16 27 43 63
2008-09 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl 56 21 26 47  +10 30
2009-10 SKA St. Petersburg 56 18 46 64  +21 38
2010-11 SKA St. Petersburg 52 15 18 33 +4 50
2011-12 CSKA Moscow 43 9 11 20 0 18
Totals USSR/RHL/KHL Reg. Season 365 103 151 254 264
Totals RHL/KHL Playoffs 65 29 32 61 54
Totals NHL Reg. Season 850 337 444 781 -83 401
Totals NHL Playoffs 48 11 16 27 -16 24

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1991 European U18 5 1 3 4 2
1992 World U20 7 4 2 6 2
1993 World U20 3 1 0 1 4
1993 World Championship 8 2 1 3 5
1994 World Championship 5 1 2 3 8
1996 World Championship 8 4 5 9 4
1996 World Cup 5 0 2 2 6
1997 World Championship 5 3 0 3 12
1998 Olympic Games 6 3 3 6 0
1999 World Championship 6 8 1 9 6
2000 World Championship 5 1 1 2 8
2001 World Championship 7 2 3 5 6
2002 Olympic Games 6 1 1 2 0
2004 World Championship 6 1 2 3 2
2004 World Cup 4 1 2 3 4
2005 World Championship 9 2 1 3 8
2006 Olympic Games 8 1 3 4 4
Totals U18 Level 5 1 3 4 2
Totals U20 Level 10 5 2 7 6
Totals Senior Level 88 30 27 57 73

Photo Gallery:

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16
Dec
09

Alexei Kovalev

Full name: Alexei Vyacheslavovich Kovalev
Last Team: Florida Panthers
Number: 27
Position: Right Wing
Height: 6’1″/186 cm
Weight: 215 lbs/98 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: February 24, 1973 in Togliatti, RUS
Drafted: Selected by New York Rangers in 1st round (15th overall) of the 1991 Entry Draft

Strengths: Kovalev had all the characteristics of a two-way power-forward. He had a strong slapshot, was a physical threat to his opponent, and could turn defenders inside out with his playmaking skills.

Weaknesses: Despite his skills, Kovalev was an inconsistent producer – a hattrick one game, a -2 rating in the next game. Kovalev had a reputation as a player who didn’t realize his full potential.

Biography: Kovalev was raised in Togliatti – an industrial city on the Volga River. Just like many boys in his town, Alexei wanted to play hockey. His dream came true when he was only a teenager – he was chosen to be part of Dynamo’s senior team in Moscow. In 1991, Alexei was the first Russian to be drafted in the first round of the NHL’s Entry Draft, but stayed to develop further with Dynamo instead. That year, Kovalev had a breakthrough season in the Russian League, scoring 16 times in 33 games. When Kovalev signed with the New York Rangers, he was amazed with his new home and with life in the Big Apple. In his sophomore year in the NHL, Kovalev became one of the first Russians to have his name engraved on the Stanley Cup, when his Rangers edged out Pavel Bure’s Vancouver Canucks in 1994. That same year Alexei returned to Togliatti during the NHL lock-out. In 1998, Kovalev was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins. He became only the second player ever to have played alongside Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier, and Mario Lemieux. The 2000-01 season was Alexei’s best in the NHL. He set career highs for almost everything, and finished 4th in league scoring. During the 2001-02 season, Alexei suffered an injury at the beginning of the season. He scored a hat-trick in his first game back, another hat-trick in the following game, and two goals in his third game back! In February 2003, Kovalev was traded back to the team that launched his NHL career. In a year he was traded to the Montreal Canadiens, but joined a dozen other NHL stars to play for Ak Bars Kazan during the NHL lockout in 2004-05. When the NHL resumed play, Kovalev became an instant favourite among Montreal’s fans. Kovalev’s excellent production in 2007-08 was instrumental to Montreal’s finish at the top of the Eastern Conference that season. At the 2009 All-Star Game played in Montreal, Kovalev was chosen as the game’s MVP after scoring two goals, as well as the shootout winner, for the Eastern Conference team. In 2009, Kovalev signed a two-year contract with the Ottawa Senators and was traded back to Pittsburgh in 2011. In the off-season, he signed with KHL’s Atlant in Russia, but played in a limited number of games. Kovalev tried out with the Florida Panthers in 2013 and signed a one-year contract. After just over a dozen games, he was no longer needed by the team and announced his retirement. In international play, Kovalev has been a consistent contributor to Team Russia. He is a gold and bronze Olympic medalist (1992 and 2002, respectively) and has played in multiple World Cup and World Hockey Championship tournaments. In 1998, Alexei was granted a pilot’s license, and flies his small plane all over the world. He is now a helicopter pilot too. Kovalev is also actively involved with charitable causes both in North America and in Russia.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1989-90 Dynamo Moscow 1 0 0 0 0
1990-91 Dynamo-2 Moscow (USSR-3) 21 16
1990-91 Dynamo Moscow 18 1 2 3 4
1991-92 Dynamo-2 Moscow (CIS-3) 4 5 0 5 12
1991-92 Dynamo Moscow 33 16 9 25 20
1992-93 Binghampton (AHL) 13 13 11 24 35
1992-93 NY Rangers 65 20 18 38 -10 79
1993-94 NY Rangers 76 23 33 56 +18 154
1994-95 Lada Togliatti 12 8 8 16 49
1994-95 NY Rangers 48 13 15 28 -6 30
1995-96 NY Rangers 81 24 34 58 +5 98
1996-97 NY Rangers 45 13 22 35 +11 42
1997-98 NY Rangers 72 23 30 53 -22 44
1998-99 NY Rangers/Pittsburgh 77 23 30 53 +2 37
1999-00 Pittsburgh 82 26 40 66 -3 94
2000-01 Pittsburgh 79 44 51 95 +12 96
2001-02 Pittsburgh 67 32 44 76 +2 80
2002-03 Pittsburgh/NY Rangers 78 37 40 77 -9 70
2003-04 NY Rangers/Montreal 78 14 31 45 -9 66
2004-05 Ak Bars Kazan 35 10 12 22 80
2005-06 Montreal 69 23 42 65 -1 79
2006-07 Montreal 73 18 29 47 -19 78
2007-08 Montreal 82 35 49 84 +18 70
2008-09 Montreal 78 26 39 65 -5 74
2009-10 Ottawa 77 18 31 49 -8 54
2010-11 Ottawa/Pittsburgh 74 16 18 34 -6 44
2011-12 Atlant Moscow Region 22 1 5 6  -13 16
2012-13 Florida 14 2 3 5 -1 6
Totals USSR/RHL/KHL Reg. Season 121 36 36 72 169
Totals RHL Playoffs 4 0 0 0 8
Totals NHL Reg. Season 1316 430 599 1038 -31 1304
Totals NHL Playoffs 116 44 54 958 +5 104

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1990 European U18 6 4 3 7 6
1991 European U18 6 8 3 11 8
1992 World U20 7 5 5 10 2
1992 Olympic Games 8 1 2 3 14
1992 World Championship 6 0 1 1 0
1996 World Cup 5 2 1 3 8
1998 World Championship 6 5 2 7 14
2002 Olympic Games 6 3 1 4 4
2004 World Cup 4 2 1 3 4
2005 World Championship 9 3 4 7 16
2006 Olympic Games 8 4 2 6 4
Totals U18 Level 12 12 6 18 14
Totals U20 Level 7 5 5 10 2
Totals Senior Level 52 20 14 34 64

Photo Gallery:

06
Dec
09

Igor Larionov

Full name: Igor Nikolaevich Larionov
Last Team: New Jersey Devils
Number: 8
Position: Center
Height: 5’10″/175 kg
Weight: 170 lbs/77 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: December 3, 1960 in Voskresensk, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Vancouver Canucks in 11th round (214th overall) of the 1985 Entry Draft

Strengths: After more than twenty-five years of playing hockey, Larionov was still one of the best passers. He was a great leader on-ice and one of the most intelligent hockey players.

Weaknesses: In his later seasons, Larionov became a slower skater. Also, he was not a frequent goal-scorer at the NHL level.

Biography: Igor Larionov grew up in Voskresensk, a factory town not far from Moscow. Larionov was good enough to have made it to the local team Khimik at the age of seventeen. From 1977 to 1981, Igor played for his home team, scoring 73 points in 123 games. Larionov wanted to serve his two-year term in the army and return to play home, but Central Red Army coach Viktor Tikhonov did everything in his power to have Larionov on his team. In 1979 and 1980, Larionov was on the Soviet teams that won the World Junior Championship. As a member of CSKA for eight seasons, Larionov became one of the highlights of the Soviet hockey program. He was the center of the famous “KLM” line with Vladimir Krutov and Sergei Makarov. Every year, Larionov’s team was the USSR’s champion. During this span, Igor was a five-time all-star and in 1988 the Soviet Player of the Year. Larionov was also one of the best players at international tournaments. He won the gold medal at the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, and the World Championship in 1982, 1983, 1986, and 1989. In 1981, Igor helped the Soviet Union beat Canada for the Canada Cup. Along with teammate Slava Fetisov, Larionov fought for the right to continue his hockey career in the NHL. Despite being drafted in 1985, Larionov was permitted to join the Vancouver Canucks only in 1989. In the NHL, his hockey sense and creativity were only second to Wayne Gretzky’s. Igor spent three years in Vancouver, but due to contract problems between the Canucks and CSKA, Larionov left the NHL in 1992. He spent the next season playing for Lugano in Switzerland. Igor learned some Italian in the process. In 1993, Larionov returned to the NHL, but this time to the San Jose Sharks. He played with Sergei Makarov again. In October 1995, Larionov was traded to the Detroit Red Wings and joined fellow Russians Sergei Fedorov, Slava Kozlov, Slava Fetisov and Vlad Konstantinov. Larionov played a big part in helping the Red Wings win the Stanley Cup in 1997 and 1998. With Kozlov and Fetisov, Igor brought the Stanley Cup for the first time to Russia. He also brought it to his old hockey rink in Voskresensk. Larionov still played in international tournaments for Russia. He participated in the 1996 World Cup and won a bronze medal with Russia at the 2002 Olympics. In 1998, Larionov played in the NHL all-star game. After a short stint with the Florida Panthers in 2000, he returned to Detroit. Igor won his third Stanley Cup in 2002, but refused to retire. He brought the Cup to Russia again. In 2003-04, Igor played for the New Jersey Devils. He had a few problems with the coach, and his skill level decreased with age, forcing Igor to retire. On December 13, 2004, Larionov hosted an extravagant farewell game at Moscow’s Luzhniki arena. The match pitted Team Russia (a mix of past and current Russian stars, including Larionov himself, Fetisov, Nabokov, Fedorov, and Kovalchuk) versus Team World (Larionov’s former Detroit and New Jersey teammates, including Brendan Shanahan, Steve Yzerman, Chris Osgood, Scott Gomez, etc.) For the third period, Larionov and Steve switched teams and Russia won the entertaining game 6-5. In the post-game celebration, Larionov was awarded the Order of Friendship by Prime Minister Mikhail Fradkov. This was a memorable end to the legendary hockey career of one of the most highly respected people in sports.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1977-78 Khimik Voskresensk 6 3 0 3 4
1978-79 Khimik Voskresensk 32 3 4 7 12
1979-80 Khimik Voskresensk 42 11 7 18 24
1980-81 Khimik Voskresensk 43 22 23 45 36
1981-82 CSKA Moscow 46 31 22 53 6
1982-83 CSKA Moscow 44 20 19 39 20
1983-84 CSKA Moscow 43 15 26 41 30
1984-85 CSKA Moscow 40 18 28 46 20
1985-86 CSKA Moscow 40 21 31 52 33
1986-87 CSKA Moscow 39 20 26 46 34
1987-88 CSKA Moscow 51 25 32 57 54
1988-89 CSKA Moscow 31 15 12 27 22
1989-90 Vancouver 74 17 27 44 -5 20
1990-91 Vancouver 64 13 21 34 -2 14
1991-92 Vancouver 72 21 44 65 +7 54
1992-93 HC Lugano (Swiss League) 24 10 19 29 44
1993-94 San Jose 60 18 38 56 +20 40
1994-95 San Jose 33 4 20 24 -3 14
1995-96 San Jose/Detroit 73 22 51 73 +33 34
1996-97 Detroit 64 12 42 54 +31 26
1997-98 Detroit 69 8 39 47 +14 40
1998-99 Detroit 75 14 49 63 +13 48
1999-00 Detroit 79 9 38 47 +13 28
2000-01 Florida/Detroit 65 9 31 40 -5 38
2001-02 Detroit 70 11 32 43 -5 50
2002-03 Detroit 74 10 33 43 -7 48
2003-04 New Jersey 49 1 10 11 +3 20
Totals USSR League 457 204 230 434 295
Totals NHL Reg. Season 921 169 475 644 +104 474
Totals NHL Playoffs 150 30 67 97 +9 60

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1978 European U18 5 2 1 3 4
1979 World U20 5 2 4 6 8
1980 World U20 5 3 3 6 4
1981 Canada Cup 7 4 1 5 8
1982 World Championship 10 4 6 10 2
1983 World Championship 9 5 7 12 4
1984 Olympic Games 6 1 4 5 6
1985 World Championship 10 2 4 6 8
1986 World Championship 10 7 1 8 4
1987 World Championship 10 4 8 12 2
1987 Canada Cup 9 1 2 3 6
1988 Olympic Games 8 4 9 13 4
1989 World Championship 8 3 0 3 11
1996 World Cup 5 0 4 4 2
1998 Olympic Games 6 0 3 3 4
Totals U18 Level 5 2 1 3 4
Totals U20 Level 10 5 7 12 12
Totals Senior Level 98 35 49 84 61

Photo Gallery:

14
Nov
09

Vyacheslav Fetisov

Full name: Vyacheslav Aleksandrovich Fetisov
Last Team: CSKA Moscow (KHL)
Number: 2
Position: Defenseman
Height: 6’1″/183 cm
Weight: 215 lbs/98 kg
Born: April 20, 1958 in Moscow, RUS
Drafted: 1) Selected 201st overall by Montreal Canadiens in the 1978 Entry Draft; 2) Selected 150th overall by New Jersey Devils in the 1983 Entry Draft

Strengths: Slava Fetisov is one of the best defensemen to ever have played hockey. He had a unique on-the-ice presence, intimidating the opponent’s forwards. Fetisov was great at blocking shots, stealing pucks, playmaking, and creating some offense.

Weaknesses: Towards the end of his NHL career, Fetisov’s offensive contributions steadily declined.

Biography: There are many reasons why Slava Fetisov is a hero of our era. His life story doesn’t just make him one of the best hockey players ever, but a great person and leader too. In 1976, Slava was a sensation in his first season in the Soviet League with CSKA. He was eighteen years old, standing 6-foot-1 and weighing 220 pounds. A year later, he got a mysterious disease and was paralyzed waist down, losing 45 pounds in the process. The doctors said he would be lucky if he would ever walk again, but five months later, with pain, Fetisov took to the ice. At the World Junior Championship in 1978, Slava was named Best Defenseman, and his performance was good enough for him to be drafted by the NHL’s Montreal Canadiens, who later dropped Fetisov because of his unlikelihood of leaving the Soviet Union. In early 1982, Fetisov was named the captain of both the Red Army team and the national squad. Fetisov felt enormous responsibility, especially in the aftermath of superstar Valeri Kharlamov’s death and the embarrassment at the 1980 Lake Placid Olympics. Being on a team that hadn’t lost for 39 straight games, and then losing one game, many players showed their discouragement, but not Fetisov. The Soviets’ 1984 Olympic win in Sarajevo was a highlight in Slava’s career. Then, tragedy hit again: Fetisov broke his leg, making him unavailable for the 1984 Canada Cup, and the next year Slava was in a car crash, leaving Slava’s brother, Anatoli, killed. Furthermore, Fetisov was a man who refused to sign up for the Communist Party, being one of the first to take such a stand. By 1989, Fetisov was tired of coach Viktor Tikhonov and wanted to defect, but his teammates would not play without him. Back in Moscow, Fetisov was under KGB surveillance, yet managed to get a ticket to America, being among the first Soviet citizens to receive a visa for open travel, opening the doors for everyone else to follow. This was definitely a personal victory for Fetisov. Being in New Jersey, Slava felt lost, unwelcome, exhausted and lonely. In his first two months with the Devils, Fetisov lost more than in his entire career with the Soviet national team. Fetisov found greater success after being traded to Detroit in 1995 to be part of the Red Wings’ ‘Russian Five’ – himself, Sergei Fedorov, Vyacheslav Kozlov, Vladimir Konstantinov and Igor Larionov. The unit was instrumental in Detroit’s Stanley Cup win in 1997. The celebration was cut short by another tragedy. Fetisov was in the limousine that crashed into a tree and left teammate Vladimir Konstantinov and Wings’ trainer Sergei Mnatsakanov with brain damage. Fetisov lost feeling in his right leg, but recuperated to play one more season and win the Stanley Cup again. After retiring, Fetisov was an assistant coach for the Devils from 1998 to 2002. He was the head coach of Russia at the 2002 Olympics, leading the team to a bronze medal. After that, he returned to Russia to accept a post chairing the Federal Agency of Physical Culture and Sport (Rossport). Since 2008, Fetisov is a Senator in Russia’s Federation Council; he represents the far eastern region of Primorsky Krai. Fetisov also worked with the World Anti-Doping Agency and helped create the Kontinental Hockey League. In 2009, he became the President of the CSKA Moscow hockey club and even suited up to play in one game. Fetisov is truly a legend, a hero of humanity. A teammate died, his brother died, his every move was followed by the KGB, he fought for freedom, battled loneliness in a foreign land, two more friends were left paralyzed for life… but Fetisov countered that with two Olympic gold medals, two World Junior Championship wins, seven World Championship wins, nine Soviet all-star berths, nine USSR 1st team honors, thirteen Soviet League championships, three European Player of the Year awards, two Stanley Cups, and the respect of millions.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1974-75 CSKA Moscow 1 0 0 0 0
1976-77 CSKA Moscow 28 3 4 7 14
1977-78 CSKA Moscow 35 9 18 27 46
1978-79 CSKA Moscow 29 10 19 29 40
1979-80 CSKA Moscow 37 10 14 24 46
1980-81 CSKA Moscow 48 13 16 29 44
1981-82 CSKA Moscow 46 15 26 41 20
1982-83 CSKA Moscow 43 6 17 23 46
1983-84 CSKA Moscow 44 19 30 49 38
1984-85 CSKA Moscow 20 13 12 25 6
1985-86 CSKA Moscow 40 15 19 34 12
1986-87 CSKA Moscow 39 13 20 33 18
1987-88 CSKA Moscow 46 18 17 35 26
1988-89 CSKA Moscow 23 9 8 17 18
1989-90 New Jersey 72 8 34 42 +9 52
1990-91 New Jersey 67 3 16 19 +5 62
1991-92 New Jersey 70 3 23 26 +11 108
1992-93 New Jersey 76 4 23 27 +7 158
1993-94 New Jersey 52 1 14 15 +14 30
1994-95 New Jersey/Detroit 18 3 12 15 +1 2
1995-96 Detroit 69 7 35 42 +37 96
1996-97 Detroit 64 5 23 28 +26 76
1997-98 Detroit 58 2 12 14 +4 72
2009-10 CSKA Moscow 1 0 0 0 -1 0
Totals USSR/KHL Reg. Season 480 153 220 373 374
Totals NHL Reg. Season 546 36 192 228 +114 656
Totals NHL Playoffs 116 2 26 28 +3 147

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1975 European U18 5 1 0 1 0
1976 European U18 4 2 0 2 0
1976 World U20 4 0 0 0 11
1977 World U20 7 3 2 5 4
1977 World Championship 5 3 3 6 2
1978 World U20 7 3 5 8 6
1978 World Championship 10 4 6 10 11
1980 Olympic Games 7 5 4 9 10
1981 World Championship 8 1 4 5 6
1981 Canada Cup 7 1 7 8 10
1982 World Championship 10 4 3 7 6
1983 World Championship 10 3 7 10 8
1984 Olympic Games 7 3 8 11 8
1985 World Championship 10 6 7 13 15
1986 World Championship 10 6 9 15 10
1987 World Championship 10 2 8 10 2
1987 Canada Cup 9 2 5 7 9
1988 Olympic Games 8 4 9 13 6
1989 World Championship 10 2 4 6 17
1990 World Championship 8 2 8 10 8
1996 World Cup 4 0 2 2 12
Totals U18 Level 9 3 0 3 0
Totals U20 Level 18 6 7 16 21
Totals Senior Level 128 40 94 134 140

Photo Gallery:

08
Nov
09

Alexander Mogilny

Full Name: Alexander Gennadievich Mogilny
Last team: New Jersey Devils
Number: 89
Position: Right Wing
Height: 6’0″/183 cm
Weight: 210 lbs/95 kg
Born: February 18, 1969 in Khabarovsk, USSR
Drafted: Selected by Buffalo Sabres in 5th round (89th overall) of the 1988 NHL Entry Draft

Strengths: In his prime, Mogilny lived up to his nickname – Alexander the Great. He was a threat to the opposing team by making very exciting offensive moves that reflected his speed, shooting, and passing accuracy.

Weaknesses: Sometimes Mogilny went through cold streaks. Hip and back injuries forced Mogilny to retire early from professional hockey.

Biography: It took Alexander many steps to get to where he is today. Being born in Khabarovsk, a city in the Far East, there was little hope for anyone to become a hockey star. Mogilny became an exception. He was picked to the Moscow Red Army’s senior team at the age of 17. To replace the famous KLM line (Krutov-Larionov-Makarov), coach Viktor Tikhonov put Mogilny with fellow teenagers Pavel Bure and Sergei Fedorov. The line clicked immediately, helping the Soviet Union win back-to-back gold medals at the World Junior Championship in 1988 and 1989. Mogilny won the tournament MVP Award. He was so skilled that he even brought a smile to Tikhonov’s face – a rare accomplishment. During the 1989 celebrations in Sweden, Mogilny said goodbye only to Fedorov and disappeared from the team. Alexander met with Buffalo Sabres representatives and he was flown to North America. His high-profile defection led the way for other East European players to follow. Mogilny adapted easily to the NHL. He scored a whopping 76 goals in the 1992-93 season, tying for the NHL goal-scoring lead! Alex was named captain of the Buffalo Sabres in 1993, but then he was part of a blockbuster deal that sent him to the Vancouver Canucks in 1995. Mogilny and Bure were reunited. After one strong season, the next couple of years were full of injuries. The 1996 World cup was the last time Mogilny put on the Team Russia jersey, because he believed that younger players should be given a chance instead. Alexander was traded to the Devils in 2000; he immediately helped them win the Stanley Cup. The following season Mogilny was one of the best scorers, clicking on a line with Scott Gomez and Sergei Nemchinov. After signing with the Maple Leafs, Mogilny’s first season in Toronto was inconsistent, but in the playoffs he single-handedly won games 6 and 7 of the series against the Islanders, and game 7 against Ottawa. In the next season Alexander rebounded with two hat-tricks and the Lady Byng Trophy as the league’s most gentlemanly player, but missed most of the next season due to an ailing hip. In Toronto, Mogilny built a reputation for his sense of humour with reporters. After the NHL lockout, Mogilny returned to New Jersey. Because of a salary cap, the Devils could not carry Mogilny’s salary, so Alexander spent part of 2005-06 in the American Hockey League. Mogilny has retired from the NHL since, but occasionally takes part in charity games. In 2010, Mogilny was named the Vice-President of the Kontinental Hockey League.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1986-87 CSKA Moscow 28 15 1 16 4
1987-88 CSKA Moscow 39 12 8 20 14
1988-89 CSKA Moscow 31 11 11 22 24
1989-90 Buffalo 65 15 28 43 +8 16
1990-91 Buffalo 62 30 34 64 +14 16
1991-92 Buffalo 67 39 45 84 +7 73
1992-93 Buffalo 77 76 51 127 +7 40
1993-94 Buffalo 66 32 47 79 +8 22
1994-95 Spartak Moscow 1 0 1 1 0
1994-95 Buffalo 44 19 28 47 0 36
1995-96 Vancouver 79 55 52 107 +14 16
1996-97 Vancouver 76 31 42 73 +9 18
1997-98 Vancouver 51 18 27 45 -6 36
1998-99 Vancouver 59 14 31 45 0 58
1999-00 Vancouver/New Jersey 59 24 20 44 +3 20
2000-01 New Jersey 75 43 40 83 +10 43
2001-02 Toronto 66 24 33 57 +1 8
2002-03 Toronto 73 33 46 79 +4 12
2003-04 Toronto 37 8 22 30 +9 12
2005-06 New Jersey 34 12 13 25 -7 6
2005-06 Albany (AHL) 19 4 10 14 17
Totals USSR League 99 38 21 59 42
Totals NHL Reg. Season 990 473 559 1032 +81 432
Totals NHL Playoffs 124 39 47 86 -2 58

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1986 European U18 5 4 1 5 4
1987 World U20 6 3 2 5 4
1988 World U20 7 8 10 18 2
1988 Olympic Games 6 3 2 5 2
1989 World U20 7 7 5 12 4
1989 World Championship 10 0 3 3 2
1996 World Cup 5 2 4 6 0
Totals U18 Level 5 4 1 5 4
Totals U20 Level 20 18 17 35 10
Totals Senior Level 21 5 9 14 4

Photo Gallery:

06
Nov
09

Pavel Bure

Full name: Pavel Vladimirovich Bure
Last team: New York Rangers
Number: 9
Position: Right Wing
Height: 5’10″/180 cm
Weight: 190 lbs/85 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: March 31, 1971 in Moscow, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Vancouver Canucks in 6th round (113th overall) of the 1989 Entry Draft

Strengths: Pavel Bure was a very rare talent: he shot the puck from anywhere, had magical stick-handling ability, and his aim was one of the most precise in hockey. He was a natural goal scorer as well as one of the fastest skaters in the world.

Weaknesses: Bure’s defensive skills were below average for a leading star forward, making him frequently labeled as a one-dimensional player. Bure’s knee injuries and surgeries forced him to retire from playing at the age of 32.

Biography: How did Pavel Bure get to be nicknamed “The Russian Rocket” and become one of the best hockey players in the world? It all started when Pavel was a little boy, and his father – Olympic swimming gold-medalist Vladimir Bure – took him to the rink to teach him how to skate. Pavel wore his mother’s figure skates, and held on to a sliding chair so he wouldn’t fall. About a decade later, Pavel joined the legendary CSKA team in Moscow and won the title of Soviet National Rookie of the Year after his first full season. At the 1989 NHL Entry Draft, Bure was selected only 113th overall, so he played another great season with CSKA before he was signed by the Vancouver Canucks. That was also when Pavel’s international career elevated. He played in three World Junior Championships, winning gold in 1989 and silver in the next two years. That was when he became part of one of the most dangerous forward lines at the time: Mogilny-Fedorov-Bure. That line anchored the Soviet Union to gold at the 1990 World Championship. In his first NHL season, Pavel unsurprisingly won the Calder Trophy as the top rookie! He had a pair of 60-goal seasons under the tenure of coach Pat Quinn. In 1994, Pavel’s leadership and talents helped the Canucks reach the 1994 Stanley Cup final, where they lost to Pavel’s future club, the New York Rangers. Then, Bure began to be plagued by injuries. His reunion in Vancouver with Alexander Mogilny did not last long – Bure missed a lot of games in 1996. But the Russian Rocket managed to come back and rock the hockey world again. At the 1998 Olympics, other than winning the silver medal Pavel led all Olympians with nine goals in and was named top forward of the tournament. In March 1999, he was part of a blockbuster deal that sent him to the Florida Panthers. In 2000, Bure led the NHL in goals, with 58, helping his team finish fifth in the Eastern Conference. One of the highlights of Pavel’s career was playing with his brother Valeri at the 2000 All-Star game in Toronto; Valeri helped Pavel win the game’s MVP award. Next season, Bure again led the league in goals. Unfortunately, his next two seasons were not as successful. In March 2002, Pavel was traded to the New York Rangers, but in his first season with the club, he suffered a season-ending knee injury. After a brief stint in the following campaign, Pavel re-injured his knees and formally retired from playing hockey in 2005. Pavel took on a new challenge when he served as the General Manager of Russia’s men’s hockey team for the 2006 Olympics. In 2012, Bure was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fall and on November 2, 2013 his number 10 was retired by the Vancouver Canucks organization.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1987-88 CSKA Moscow 5 1 1 2 0
1988-89 CSKA Moscow 32 17 9 26 8
1989-90 CSKA Moscow 46 14 10 24 20
1990-91 CSKA Moscow 44 35 11 46 24
1991-92 Vancouver 65 34 26 60 0 30
1992-93 Vancouver 83 60 50 110 +35 69
1993-94 Vancouver 76 60 47 107 +1 86
1994-95 EV Landshut (DEL) 1 3 0 3 2
1994-95 Spartak Moscow 1 2 0 2 2
1994-95 Vancouver 44 20 23 43 -8 47
1995-96 Vancouver 15 6 7 13 -2 8
1996-97 Vancouver 63 23 32 55 -14 40
1997-98 Vancouver 82 51 39 90 +5 48
1998-99 Florida 11 13 3 16 +3 4
1999-00 Florida 74 58 36 94 +25 16
2000-01 Florida 82 59 33 92 -2 58
2001-02 Florida/NY Rangers 68 34 35 69 -5 62
2002-03 NY Rangers 39 19 11 30 +4 16
Totals USSR/Rus. League 128 69 31 100 54
Totals NHL Reg. Season 702 437 342 779 +42 484
Totals NHL Playoffs 64 35 35 70 +8 74

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1988 European U18 6 10 0 10 2
1989 European U18 6 5 6 11 4
1989 World U20 7 8 6 14 4
1990 World U20 7 7 3 10 10
1990 World Championship 10 2 4 6 10
1991 World U20 7 12 3 15 31
1991 World Championship 10 3 8 11 2
1998 Olympic Games 6 9 0 9 2
2000 World Championship 6 4 1 5 10
2002 Olympic Games 6 2 1 3 8
Totals U18 Level 12 15 6 21 6
Totals U20 Level 21 27 12 39 45
Totals Senior Level 38 20 14 34 32

Photo Gallery:

29
Oct
09

Sergei Fedorov

Sergei Viktorovich Fedorov
Last Team: Metallurg Magnitogorsk (KHL)
Number: 18
Position: Center
Height: 6’1″/185 cm
Weight: 202 lbs/91 kg
Shoots: Left
Born: December 13, 1969 in Pskov, RUS
Drafted: Selected by Detroit Red Wings in 4th round (74th overall) of the 1989 Entry Draft

Strengths: Fedorov has been one of the best all-around hockey players for over two decades. He was fast and his defensive qualities were better than those of many defensemen. Whether playing for his club or for the national team, Fedorov’s leadership qualities were irreplaceable.

Weaknesses: Sergei Fedorov’s production had been in decline in his last few seasons. He was no longer the dominant playmaker he previously was.

Biography: As a boy growing up in Pskov – an ancient city near Russia’s western border – Sergei had a lot of potential as a hockey player. He was accepted by the legendary Red Army’s junior team at the age of 15. After a vigorous regimen of training, Fedorov did very well. Sergei became friends and linemates with fellow rising stars Pavel Bure and Alexander Mogilny. Their line helped “CCCP” not only win back-to-back junior championships, but the World Championships as well at the end of the 1980s and early 1990s. In 1990, Sergei took advantage of an opportunity to make it to the NHL. Fedorov’s defection was not as highly publicized as Mogilny’s, but it was still an important event for hockey. Not knowing English, Sergei joined the Detroit Red Wings with a new number – 91. After his first season Fedorov was chosen to the NHL’s all-rookie team. In the 1993-94 season, Fedorov trailed only Wayne Gretzky in league scoring! That year he won the Hart Trophy (as the Most Valuable Player), the Pearson Award (as MVP chosen by players), and the Selke Trophy (best defensive forward). Sergei was a vital part of Detroit’s Stanley Cup wins in 1997 and 1998, although he missed most of the 1997-98 season due to a contract holdout. The Carolina Hurricanes offered him a $38 million 6-year deal, but the Red Wings matched it. The year before, Fedorov earned a whopping $20 million ($2 million salary + bonuses)! That money helped him create the Sergei Fedorov Fund that helps children not only in Detroit, but in Russia as well. Although becoming a U.S. citizen, Sergei of course continued to play for Russia. He was a key part of Russia’s silver and bronze medal finishes at the 1998 and 2002 Olympics. During the 2001-02 season under Scotty Bowman’s coaching, Fedorov experimentally played defense. Sergei is a rare player who can be committed to defense, but still be the best offensive player on the ice. This was shown in the 2002 playoffs, in which Fedorov recorded 19 points. In 2003, Sergei decided for a change and signed with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. In 2005, he was traded to the Columbus Blue Jackets. After a few mediocre non-playoff years, Fedorov rejuvenated with the Washington Capitals, where he had a leading role in taking them to the playoffs in 2008. In the same year, Fedorov made a successful return to the national team, playing on a line with his Capitals teammates Alexander Semin and Alexander Ovechkin, and leading Russia to its first World Championship gold medal since 1993. In 2009, Sergei returned to Russia to play with his brother Fedor for KHL’s Metallurg Magnitogorsk. Fedorov was an irreplaceable leader on Metallurg, but retired in 2012 after 26 years of professional hockey. Sergei is now the general manager of CSKA Moscow – the hockey club that made him a star.

Club Stats:

Season Team GP G A PTS +/- PIM
1985-86 Dynamo-2 Minsk (USSR-2) 15 6 1 7 10
1986-87 CSKA Moscow 29 6 6 12 12
1987-88 CSKA Moscow 48 7 9 16 20
1988-89 CSKA Moscow 44 9 8 17 35
1989-90 CSKA Moscow 48 19 10 29 22
1990-91 Detroit 77 31 48 79 +11 66
1991-92 Detroit 80 32 54 86 +29 72
1992-93 Detroit 73 34 53 87 +33 72
1993-94 Detroit 82 56 64 120 +48 34
1994-95 Detroit 42 50 30 50 +6 24
1995-96 Detroit 78 39 68 107 +49 48
1996-97 Detroit 74 30 33 63 +29 30
1997-98 Detroit 21 6 11 17 +10 25
1998-99 Detroit 77 26 37 63 +9 66
1999-00 Detroit 68 27 35 62 +8 22
2000-01 Detroit 75 32 37 69 +12 40
2001-02 Detroit 81 31 37 68 +20 36
2002-03 Detroit 80 36 47 83 +15 52
2003-04 Anaheim 80 31 34 65 -5 42
2005-06 Anaheim/Columbus 67 12 32 44 -2 66
2006-07 Columbus 73 18 24 42 -7 56
2007-08 Columbus/Washington 68 11 30 41 -5 38
2008-09 Washington 52 11 22 33 +4 50
2009-10 Metallurg Magnitogorsk 50 9 20 29 +25 47
2010-11 Metallurg Magnitogorsk 48 7 16 23 +4 40
2011-12 Metallurg Magnitogorsk 43 6 16 22 +6 36
Totals USSR/KHL Reg. Season 310 63 85 148 210
Totals KHL Playoffs 38 7 11 18 -1 26
Totals NHL Reg. Season 1248 483 696 1179 +261 839
Totals NHL Playoffs 183 52 124 176 +38 133

National Team Stats:

Year Tournament GP G A PTS PIM
1987 World U20 6 0 0 0 8
1988 World U20 7 5 7 12 0
1989 World U20 7 4 8 12 4
1989 World Championship 10 6 3 9 10
1990 World Championship 10 4 2 6 10
1991 Canada Cup 5 2 2 4 6
1996 World Cup 5 3 3 6 2
1998 Olympic Games 6 1 5 6 8
2002 Olympic Games 6 2 2 4 4
2008 World Championship 9 5 7 12 8
2010 Olympic Games 4 0 4 4 6
2010 World Championship 9 2 4 6 12
Totals U20 Level 20 9 15 24 12
Totals Senior Level 64 25 32 57 66

Photo Gallery:




Welcome to Russkiy Hockey! This website is dedicated to the most talented Russian hockey players who bring a different game to the NHL - a game of speed, creativity, and discipline. On this site you can find out about the careers and accomplishments of these athletes, as well as about the history of Russian hockey, the latest stats of Russian hockey players, and the national team's successes at international tournaments. Enjoy your visit!

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